Unabridged Dictionary - Letter S

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                                       S

   S (?), the nineteenth letter of the English alphabet, is a consonanat,
   and  is  often called a sibilant, in allusion to its hissing sound. It
   has  two  principal  sounds; one a more hissing, as in sack, this; the
   other a vocal hissing (the same as that of z), as in is, wise. Besides
   these  it  sometimes has the sounds of sh and zh, as in sure, measure.
   It  generally  has its hissing sound at the beginning of words, but in
   the  middle  and at the end of words its sound is determined by usage.
   In  a few words it is silent, as in isle, d\'82bris. With the letter h
   it forms the digraph sh. See Guide to pronunciation, \'c5\'c5 255-261.

     NOTE: Both th e fo rm and the name of the letter S are derived from
     the  Latin,  which  got  the  letter  through  the  Greek  from the
     Ph\'91nician.  the ultimate origin is Egyptian. S is etymologically
     most  nearly  related  to  c,  z,  t, and r; as, in ice, OE. is; E.
     hence,  OE.  hennes;  E. rase, raze; erase, razor; that, G. das; E.
     reason, F. raison, L. ratio; E. was, were; chair, chaise (see C, Z,
     T, and R.).

                                      -s

   -s.

   1. [OE. es, AS. as.] The suffix used to form the plural of most words;
   as in roads, elfs, sides, accounts.

   2.  [OE.  -s,  for  older -th, AS. -\'eb.] The suffix used to form the
   third  person  singular  indicative of English verbs; as in the falls,
   tells, sends.

   3.  An  adverbial  suffix; as in towards, needs, always, -- originally
   the genitive, possesive, ending. See -'s.

                                      -'s

   -'s  [OE.  -es,  AS.  -es.]  The  suffix  used  to form the possessive
   singular of nouns; as, boy's; man's.

                                      's

   's.  A  contraction  for  is  or  (colloquially)  for has. "My heart's
   subdued." Shak.

                                     Saadh

   Sa"adh (?), n.See Sadh.

                                     Saan

   Saan (?), n. pl. (Ethnol.) Same as Bushmen.

                                   Sabadilla

   Sab`a*dil"la  (?),  n.  [Sp.  cebadilla.]  (Bot.) A Mexican liliaceous
   plant (Sch\'91nocaulon officinale); also, its seeds, which contain the
   alkaloid  veratrine. It was formerly used in medicine as an emetic and
   purgative.

                                   Sab\'91an

   Sa*b\'91"an (?), a. & n. Same as Sabianism.

                                 Sab\'91anism

   Sa*b\'91"an*ism (?), n. Same as Sabianism.

                              Sab\'91ism, Sabaism

   Sa"b\'91*ism (?), Sa"ba*ism (?), n. See Sabianism.

                                     Sabal

   Sa"bal  (?), n. (Bot.) A genus of palm trees including the palmetto of
   the Southern United States.

                                    Sabaoth

   Sab"a*oth  (s&acr;b"&asl;*&ocr;th OR s&adot;"b&amac;*&ocr;th; 277), n.
   pl. [Heb. tseb\'be'&omac;th, pl. of ts\'beb\'be', an army or host, fr.
   ts\'beb\'be', to go forth to war.]

   1. Armies; hosts.

     NOTE: [Used tw ice in the English Bible, in the phrase "The Lord of
     Sabaoth."]

   2. Incorrectly, the Sabbath.

                                    Sabbat

   Sab"bat   (?),  n.  [See  Sabbath.]  In  medi\'91val  demonology,  the
   nocturnal  assembly  in  which  demons  and  sorcerers were thought to
   celebrate their orgies.

                                  Sabbatarian

   Sab`ba*ta"ri*an  (?),  n.  [L.  Sabbatarius:  cf.  F.  sabbataire. See
   Sabbath.]

   1.  One  who  regards  and  keeps the seventh day of the week as holy,
   aggreeably to the letter of the fourth commandment in the Decalogue.

     NOTE: &hand; Th ere we re Ch ristians in  the early church who held
     this   opinion,   and  certain  Christians,  esp.  the  Seventh-day
     Baptists, hold it now.

   2. A strict observer of the Sabbath.

                                  Sabbatarian

   Sab`ba*ta"ri*an,  a. Of or pertaining to the Sabbath, or the tenets of
   Sabbatarians.

                                Sabbatarianism

   Sab`ba*ta"ri*an*ism  (?),  n.  The  tenets  of Sabbatarians. Bp. Ward.
   (1673).

                                    Sabbath

   Sab"bath  (?),  n.  [OE.  sabat,  sabbat,  F. sabbat, L. sabbatum, Gr.
   shabb\'beth, fr. sh\'bebath to rest from labor. Cf. Sabbat.]

   1.  A  season  or  day of rest; one day in seven appointed for rest or
   worship,  the  observance  of  which was enjoined upon the Jews in the
   Decalogue,  and  has  been  continued  by  the Christian church with a
   transference of the day observed from the last to the first day of the
   week, which is called also Lord's Day.

     Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Ex. xx. 8.

   2.  The seventh year, observed among the Israelites as one of rest and
   festival. Lev. xxv. 4.

   3.  Fig.:  A  time  of  rest  or repose; intermission of pain, effort,
   sorrow, or the like.

     Peaceful sleep out the sabbath of the tomb. Pope.

   Sabbath  breaker,  one who violates the law of the Sabbath. -- Sabbath
   breaking,  the  violation  of the law of the Sabbath. -- Sabbath-day's
   journey,  a distance of about a mile, which, under Rabbinical law, the
   Jews  were  allowed to travel on the Sabbath. Syn. -- Sabbath, Sunday.
   Sabbath  is  not  strictly synonymous with Sunday. Sabbath denotes the
   institution;  Sunday  is  the  name  of the first day of the week. The
   Sabbath of the Jews is on Saturday, and the Sabbath of most Christians
   on  Sunday.  In New England, the first day of the week has been called
   "the  Sabbath,"  to  mark  it  as  holy  time; Sunday is the word more
   commonly used, at present, in all parts of the United States, as it is
   in  England. "So if we will be the children of our heavenly Father, we
   must  be  careful  to  keep  the  Christian  Sabbathday,  which is the
   Sunday." Homilies.

                                  Sabbathless

   Sab"bath*less,  a.  Without  Sabbath, or intermission of labor; hence,
   without respite or rest. Bacon.

                             Sabbatic, Sabbatical

   Sab*bat"ic   (?),  Sab*bat"ic*al  (?),  a.  [Gr.  sabbatique.]  Of  or
   pertaining  to  the  Sabbath;  resembling  the  Sabbath;  enjoying  or
   bringing  an  intermission  of labor. Sabbatical year (Jewish Antiq.),
   every  seventh  year, in which the Israelites were commanded to suffer
   their fields and vineyards to rest, or lie without tillage.

                                   Sabbatism

   Sab"ba*tism  (?),  n.  [L.  sabbatismus, Gr. sabbatisme. See Sabbath.]
   Intermission of labor, as upon the Sabbath; rest. Dr. H. More.

                                   Sabbaton

   Sab"ba*ton  (?),  n. [Cf. Sp. zapaton, a large shoe, F. sabot a wooden
   shoe.]  A  round-toed, armed covering for the feet, worn during a part
   of the sixteenth century in both military and civil dress.

                                    Sabean

   Sa*be"an (?), a. & n. Same as Sabian.

                                    Sabeism

   Sa"be*ism (?), n. Same as Sabianism.

                                    Sabella

   Sa*bel"la  (?), n. [NL., fr. L. sabulum gravel.] (Zo\'94l.) A genus of
   tubiculous annelids having a circle of plumose gills around head.

                                   Sabellian

   Sa*bel"li*an  (?),  a.  Pertaining  to  the  doctrines  or  tenets  of
   Sabellius. See Sabellian, n.

                                   Sabellian

   Sa*bel"li*an  (?),  n.  (Eccl.  Hist.)  A  follower  of  Sabellius,  a
   presbyter of Ptolemais in the third century, who maintained that there
   is but one person in the Godhead, and that the Son and Holy Spirit are
   only  different  powers,  operations,  or  offices  of the one God the
   Father.

                                 Sabellianism

   Sa*bel"li*an*ism (?), n. (Eccl.) The doctrines or tenets of Sabellius.
   See Sabellian, n.

                                   Sabelloid

   Sa*bel"loid  (?), a. [Sabella + -oid.] (Zo\'94l.) Like, or related to,
   the genus Sabella. -- Sa*bel"loid, n.

                                 Saber, Sabre

   Sa"ber,  Sa"bre  (?),  n. [F. sabre, G. s\'84bel; of uncertain origin;
   cf.  Hung.  sz\'a0blya,  Pol.  szabla, Russ. sabla, and L. Gr. A sword
   with  a  broad and heavy blade, thick at the back, and usually more or
   less  curved  like  a  scimiter; a cavalry sword. Saber fish, OR Sabre
   fish (Zo\'94l.), the cutlass fish.

                                 Saber, Sabre

   Sa"ber,  Sa"bre, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sabered (?) or Sabred (; p. pr. &
   vb.  n.  Sabering  or  Sabring (.] [Cf. F. sabrer.] To strike, cut, or
   kill with a saber; to cut down, as with a saber.

     You send troops to saber and bayonet us into submission. Burke.

                             Saberbill, Sabrebill

   Sa"ber*bill`, Sa"bre*bill`, n. (Zo\'94l.) The curlew.

                                    Sabian

   Sa"bi*an   (?),   a.   [L.   Sabaeus.]   [Written   also  Sabean,  and
   Sab\'91anism.]

   1.  Of  or  pertaining  to  Saba  in  Arabia, celebrated for producing
   aromatic plants.

   2. Relating to the religion of Saba, or to the worship of the heavenly
   bodies.

                                    Sabian

   Sa"bi*an,  n.  An  adherent of the Sabian religion; a worshiper of the
   heavenly bodies. [Written also Sab\'91an, and Sabean.]

                                   Sabianism

   Sa"bi*an*ism (?), n. The doctrine of the Sabians; the Sabian religion;
   that  species  of idolatry which consists in worshiping the sun, moon,
   and stars; heliolatry. [Written also Sab\'91anism.]

                                    Sabicu

   Sab"i*cu  (?),  n. The very hard wood of a leguminous West Indian tree
   (Lysilona Sabicu), valued for shipbuilding.

                                    Sabine

   Sa"bine (?), a. [L. Sabinus.] Of or pertaining to the ancient Sabines,
   a people of Italy. -- n. One of the Sabine people.

                                    Sabine

   Sab"ine  (?), n. [F., fr. L. Sabina herba, fr. Sabini the Sabines. Cf.
   Savin.] (Bot.) See Savin.

                                     Sable

   Sa"ble  (?),  n.  [OF.  sable,  F.  zibeline  sable  (in sense 4), LL.
   sabellum; cf. D. sabel, Dan. sabel, zobel, Sw. sabel, sobel, G. zobel;
   all fr. Russ. s\'a2bole.]

   1.  (Zo\'94l.)  A  carnivorous  animal  of  the Weasel family (Mustela
   zibellina)  native  of  the  northern  latitudes  of Europe, Asia, and
   America, -- noted for its fine, soft, and valuable fur.

     NOTE: &hand; Th e sable resembles the marten, but has a longer head
     and  ears. Its fur consists of a soft under wool, with a dense coat
     of  hair,  overtopped by another still longer. It varies greatly in
     color  and  quality according to the locality and the season of the
     year.  The  darkest  and most valuable furs are taken in autumn and
     winter  in  the  colder parts of Siberia, Russia, and British North
     America.

     NOTE: &hand; The American sable, or marten, was formerly considered
     a  distinct species (Mustela Americana), but it differs very little
     from  the  Asiatic sable, and is now considered only a geographical
     variety.

   2. The fur of the sable.

   3.  A  mouring  garment;  a  funeral robe; -- generally in the plural.
   "Sables wove by destiny." Young.

   4.   (Her.)  The  tincture  black;  --  represented  by  vertical  and
   horizontal lines each other.

                                     Sable

   Sa"ble  (?),  a. Of the color of the sable's fur; dark; black; -- used
   chiefly in poetry.

     Night, sable goddess! from her ebon throne, In rayless majesty, now
     stretches forth Her leaden scepter o'er a slumbering world. Young.

   Sable antelope (Zo\'94l.), a large South African antelope (Hippotragus
   niger).  Both  sexes  have long, sharp horns. The adult male is black;
   the  female  is  dark  chestnut above, white beneath. -- Sable iron, a
   superior  quality  of  Russia  iron;  --  so called because originally
   stamped  with  the  figure  of a sable. -- Sable mouse (Zo\'94l.), the
   lemming.

                                     Sable

   Sa"ble,  v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sabled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sabling (?).]
   To render sable or dark; to drape darkly or in black.

     Sabled all in black the shady sky. G. Fletcher.

                                     Sabot

   Sa`bot" (?), n. [F.]

   1.  A  kind  of  wooden shoe worn by the peasantry in France, Belgium,
   Sweden, and some other European countries.

   2.  (Mil.)  A thick, circular disk of wood, to which the cartridge bag
   and  projectile  are attached, in fixed ammunition for cannon; also, a
   piece of soft metal attached to a projectile to take the groove of the
   rifling.

                                 Saboti\'8are

   Sa`bo"ti\'8are (?), n. [F.] A kind of freezer for ices.

                                     Sabre

   Sa"bre (?), n. & v. See Saber.

                                  Sabretasche

   Sa"bre*tasche`  (?),  n. [F. sabretache, G. s\'84bel, tasche; s\'84bel
   salber  +  tasche  a  pocket.] (Mil.) A leather case or pocket worn by
   cavalry  at  the  left  side,  suspended from the sword belt. Campbell
   (Dict. Mil. Sci. ).

                                 Sabrina work

   Sa*bri"na  work`  (?). A variety of appliqu\'82 work for quilts, table
   covers, etc. Caulfeild & S. (Dict. of Needlework).

                                   Sabulose

   Sab"u*lose  (?), a. [L. sabulosus, from sabulum, sabulo, sand.] (Bot.)
   Growing in sandy places.

                                  Sabulosity

   Sab`u*los"i*ty  (?),  n.  The  quality  of  being sabulous; sandiness;
   grittiness.

                                   Sabulous

   Sab"u*lous (?), a. [L. sabulosus.] Sandy; gritty.

                                      Sac

   Sac (?), n. (Ethnol.) See Sace.

                                      Sac

   Sac,  n.  [See Sake, Soc.] (O.Eng. Law) The privilege formerly enjoyed
   the  lord  of  a manor, of holding courts, trying causes, and imposing
   fines. Cowell.

                                      Sac

   Sac (?), n. [F., fr. L. saccus a sack. See Sack a bag.]

   1. See 2d Sack.

   2. (Biol.) A cavity, bag, or receptacle, usually containing fluid, and
   either closed, or opening into another cavity to the exterior; a sack.

                                   Sacalait

   Sac"a*lait (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) A kind of fresh-water bass; the crappie.
   [Southern U.S.]

                                     Sacar

   Sa"car (?), n. See Saker.

                                    Saccade

   Sac*cade"  (?),  n.  [F.] (Man.) A sudden, violent check of a horse by
   drawing or twitching the reins on a sudden and with one pull.

                                    Saccate

   Sac"cate (?), a. [NL. saccatus, fr. L. saccus a sack, bag.]

   1.  (Biol.)  Having the form of a sack or pouch; furnished with a sack
   or pouch, as a petal.

   2.  (Zo\'94l.)  Of  or  pertaining  to  the  Saccata,  a  suborder  of
   ctenophores  having  two  pouches into which the long tentacles can be
   retracted.

                                  Saccharate

   Sac"cha*rate  (?),  n.  (Chem.) (a) A salt of saccharic acid. (b) In a
   wider  sense,  a  compound of saccharose, or any similar carbohydrate,
   with such bases as the oxides of calcium, barium, or lead; a sucrate.

                                   Saccharic

   Sac*char"ic  (?),  a.  (Chem.)  Of,  pertaining  to, or obtained from,
   saccharine  substances; specifically, designating an acid obtained, as
   a  white  amorphous  gummy mass, by the oxidation of mannite, glucose,
   sucrose, etc.

                                Sacchariferous

   Sac`cha*rif"er*ous  (?),  a. [L. saccharon sugar + -ferous.] Producing
   sugar; as, sacchariferous canes.

                                  Saccharify

   Sac*char"i*fy  (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saccharified (?); p. pr. & vb.
   n. Saccharifing (?).] [L. saccharon sugar + -fy: cf. F. saccharifier.]
   Toconvert into, or to impregnate with, sugar.

                                  Saccharilla

   Sac`cha*ril"la (?), n. A kind of muslin.

                                 Saccharimeter

   Sac`cha*rim"e*ter  (?),  n.  [L.  saccharon  sugar  +  -meter:  cf. F.
   saccharim\'8atre.]   An  instrument  for  ascertain  the  quantity  of
   saccharine  matter  in  any  solution,  as  the  juice  of a plant, or
   brewers' and distillers' worts. [Written also saccharometer.]

     NOTE: &hand; Th  e co  mmon sa ccharimeter of  th e br ewer is  an 
     hydrometer  adapted  by  its  scale  to point out the proportion of
     saccharine  matter  in  a  solution  of  any  specific gravity. The
     polarizing  saccharimeter  of  the  chemist  is  a  complex optical
     apparatus,  in  which  polarized  light  is transmitted through the
     saccharine  solution,  and the proportion of sugar indicated by the
     relative deviation of the plane of polarization.

                               Saccharimetrical

   Sac`cha*ri*met"ric*al  (?),  a.  Of  or  pertaining  to saccharimetry;
   obtained saccharimetry.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Page 1265

                                 Saccharimetry

   Sac`cha*rim"e*try  (?),  n.  The act, process or method of determining
   the amount and kind of sugar present in sirup, molasses, and the like,
   especially by the employment of polarizing apparatus.

                                   Saccharin

   Sac"cha*rin  (?),  n.  [F., from L. saccharon sugar.] (Chem.) A bitter
   white  crystalline  substance  obtained  from  the  saccharinates  and
   regarded  as  the  lactone  of  saccharinic acid; -- so called because
   formerly supposed to be isomeric with cane sugar (saccharose).

                                 Saccharinate

   Sac"cha*ri*nate  (?), n. (Chem.) (a) A salt of saccharinic acid. (b) A
   salt of saccharine.

                                  Saccharine

   Sac"cha*rine  (?  OR ?), a. [F. saccharin, fr. L. saccharob sugar, Gr.
   &cced;arkara.  Cf.  Sugar.]  Of  or  pertaining  to  sugar; having the
   qualities  of  sugar;  producing sugar; sweet; as, a saccharine taste;
   saccharine matter.

                                  Saccharine

   Sac"cha*rine (? OR ?), n. (Chem.) A trade name for benzoic sulphinide.
   [Written  also  saccharin.]  <-- A synthetic sweetening agent used (in
   the  form  of  the  sodium salt) as a non-caloric sweetening agent, to
   avoid  gaining  weight  or  for  medical  purposes. Benzoic sulfimide,
   C7H5NO3S. -->

                                  Saccharinic

   Sac"cha*rin"ic  (?),  a.  (Chem.)  Of, pertaining to, or derived from,
   saccharin;  specifically,  designating a complex acid not known in the
   free  state but well known in its salts, which are obtained by boiling
   dextrose and levulose (invert sugar) with milk of lime.

                                  Saccharize

   Sac"cha*rize (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saccharized (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Saccharizing (?).] To convert into, or to impregnate with, sugar.

                           Saccharoid, Saccharoidal

   Sac"cha*roid  (?), Sac`cha*roid"al (?), a. [L. saccharon sugar + -oid:
   cf.  F.  saccharo\'8bde.]  resembling  sugar, as in taste, appearance,
   consistency, or composition; as, saccharoidal limestone.

                                 Saccharometer

   Sac`cha*rom"e*ter (?), n. A saccharimeter.

                                 Saccharomyces

   Sac`cha*ro*my"ces  (?),  n.  [NL.,  fr. Gr. (Biol.) A genus of budding
   fungi,  the  various  species of which have the power, to a greater or
   less  extent,  or  splitting  up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid.
   They  are  the  active agents in producing fermentation of wine, beer,
   etc. Saccharomyces cerevisi\'91 is the yeast of sedimentary beer. Also
   called Torula.<-- Brewers' yeast is Saccharomyces cerevisiae. -->

                                Saccharomycetes

   Sac`cha*ro*my*ce"tes  (?), n. pl. (Biol.) A family of fungi consisting
   of the one genus Saccharomyces.

                                 Saccharonate

   Sac"cha*ro*nate (?), n. (Chem.) A salt of saccharonic acid.

                                  Saccharone

   Sac"cha*rone  (?),  n.  [Saccharin  +  lactone,]  (Chem.)  (a) A white
   crystalline substance, C6H8O6, obtained by the oxidation of saccharin,
   and  regarded  as the lactone of saccharonic acid. (b) An oily liquid,
   C6H10O2, obtained by the reduction of saccharin.

                                  Saccharonic

   Sac`cha*ron"ic  (?),  a.  (Chem.)  Of, pertaining to, or derived from,
   saccharone;  specifically,  designating  an  unstable  acid  which  is
   obtained  from  saccharone  (a)  by  hydration, and forms a well-known
   series of salts.

                                  Saccharose

   Sac"cha*rose`  (?),  n. (Chem.) Cane sugar; sucrose; also, in general,
   any  one  of  the group of which saccharose, or sucrose proper, is the
   type. See Sucrose.

                                  Saccharous

   Sac"cha*rous (?), a. Saccharine.

                                   Saccharum

   Sac"cha*rum  (?),  n.  [NL.  See  Saccharine.]  (Bot.) A genus of tall
   tropical grasses including the sugar cane.

                                 Saccholactate

   Sac`cho*lac"tate  (?),  n.  [See  Saccharolactatic.] (Chem.) A salt of
   saccholactactic  acid;  -- formerly called also saccholate. [Obs.] See
   Mucate.

                                 Saccholactic

   Sac`cho*lac"tic  (?),  a.  [L.  saccharon  sugar + lac, lactis, milk.]
   (Chem.)  Of,  pertaining  to, or designating, an acid now called mucic
   acid; saccholic. [Obs.]

                                   Saccholic

   Sac*chol"ic (?), a. Saccholatic. [Obs.]

                                  Sacchulmate

   Sac*chul"mate (?), n. (Chem.) A salt of sacchulmic acid.

                                  Sacchulmic

   Sac*chul"mic  (?), a. [Saccharine + ulmic.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to,
   or  designating, an acid obtained as a dark amorphous substance by the
   long-continued  boiling of sucrose with very dilute sulphuric acid. It
   resembles humic acid. [Written also sacculmic.]

                                  Sacchulmin

   Sac*chul"min   (?),   n.  (Chem.)  An  amorphous  huminlike  substance
   resembling sacchulmic acid, and produced together with it.

                                  Sacciferous

   Sac*cif"er*ous (?), a. [L. saccus a sack + -ferous.] (Biol.) Bearing a
   sac.

                                   Sacciform

   Sac"ci*form  (?),  a.  [L.  saccus a sack + -form.] (Biol.) Having the
   general form of a sac.

                                  Saccoglossa

   Sac`co*glos"sa (?), n. pl. [NL., fr. L. saccus a sack + Gr. (Zo\'94l.)
   Same as Pellibranchiata.

                                   Saccular

   Sac"cu*lar (?), a. Like a sac; sacciform.

                                  Sacculated

   Sac"cu*la`ted (?), a. Furnished with little sacs.

                                    Saccule

   Sac"cule  (?),  n.  [L.  sacculus, dim. of saccus sack.] A little sac;
   specifically, the sacculus of the ear.

                               Sacculo-cochlear

   Sac`cu*lo-coch"le*ar  (?),  a.  (Anat.) pertaining to the sacculus and
   cochlea of the ear.

                               Sacculo-utricular

   Sac`cu*lo-u*tric"u*lar  (?), a. (Anat.) Pertaining to the sacculus and
   utriculus of the ear.

                                   Sacculus

   Sac"cu*lus  (?),  n.;  pl.  Sacculi  (#). [L., little sack.] (Anat.) A
   little  sac;  esp., a part of the membranous labyrinth of the ear. See
   the Note under Ear.

                                    Saccus

   Sac"cus (?), n.; pl. Sacci (#). [L., a sack.] (Biol.) A sac.

                                   Sacellum

   Sa*cel"lum  (?),  n.;  pl.  Sacella  (#). [L., dim. of sacrum a sacred
   place.] (a) (Rom. Antiq.) An unroofed space consecrated to a divinity.
   (b) (Eccl.) A small monumental chapel in a church. Shipley.

                                  Sacerdotal

   Sac`er*do"tal (?), a. [L. sacerdotalis, fr. sacerdos, -otis, a priest,
   fr.sacer  holy,  sacred:  cf.  F.  sacerdotal.]  Of  or  pertaining to
   priests,  or  to  the  order  of  priests; relating to the priesthood;
   priesty; as, sacerdotal dignity; sacerdotal functions.

     The  ascendency  of  the  sacerdotal  order was long the ascendency
     which  naturally  and properly belongs to intellectual superiority.
     Macaulay.

                                 Sacerdotalism

   Sac`er*do"tal*ism  (?), m. The system, style, spirit, or character, of
   a  priesthood,  or  sacerdotal order; devotion to the interests of the
   sacerdotal order.

                                 Sacerdotally

   Sac`er*do"tal*ly, adv. In a sacerdotal manner.

                                    Sachel

   Sach"el (?), n. A small bag. See Satchel.

                                    Sachem

   Sa"chem  (?),  n.  A  chief  of  a  tribe  of  the American Indians; a
   sagamore.

                                   Sachemdom

   Sa"chem*dom (?), n. The government or jurisdiction of a sachem. Dr. T.
   Dwight.

                                  Sachemship

   Sa"chem*ship, n. Office or condition of a sachem.

                                    Sachet

   Sa`chet"  (?),  n. [F., dim. of sac. See Sac.] A scent bag, or perfume
   cushion,  to  be  laid among handkerchiefe, garments, etc., to perfume
   them.

                                    Saciety

   Sa*ci"e*ty (?), n. Satiety. [Obs.] Bacon.

                                     Sack

   Sack  (?),  n. [OE. seck, F. sec dry (cf. Sp. seco, It secco), from L.
   siccus  dry,  harsh; perhaps akin to Gr. sikata sand, Ir. sesc dry, W.
   hysp.  Cf.  Desiccate.]  A  anme formerly given to various dry Spanish
   wines.  "Sherris  sack." Shak. Sack posset, a posset made of sack, and
   some other ingredients.

                                     Sack

   Sack,  n. [OE. sak, sek, AS. sacc, s\'91cc, L. saccus, Gr. sak; cf. F.
   sac from the Latin. Cf. Sac, Satchel, Sack to plunder.]

   1. A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made
   of  some  kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a
   large pouch.

   2.  A  measure  of  varying capacity, according to local usage and the
   substance. The American sack of salt is 215 pounds; the sack of wheat,
   two bushels. McElrath.

   3.  [Perhaps a different word.] Originally, a loosely hanging garnment
   for  women,  worn  like  a cloak about the shoulders, and serving as a
   decorative  appendage to the gown; now, an outer garment with sleeves,
   worn by women; as, a dressing saek. [Written also sacque.]

   4.  A sack coat; a kind of coat worn by men, and extending from top to
   bottom without a cross seam.

   5. (Biol.) See 2d Sac, 2. <--6. [Colloq.] Bed. -->
   Sack  bearer  (Zo\'94l.).  See Basket worm, under Basket. -- Sack tree
   (Bot.),  an  East  Indian  tree (Antiaris saccidora) which is cut into
   lengths,  and  made  into  sacks  by  turning the bark inside out, and
   leaving  a  slice  of the wood for a bottom. -- To give the sack to OR
   get  the  sack,  to  discharge,  or be discharged, from employment; to
   jilt, or be jilted. [Slang]<-- hit the sack, go to bed. -->

                                     Sack

   Sack, v. t.

   1. To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn.

     Bolsters sacked in cloth, blue and crimson. L. Wallace.

   2.  To  bear  or  carry  in  a  sack  upon  the back or the shoulders.
   [Colloq.]

                                     Sack

   Sack,  n.  [F. sac plunder, pillage, originally, a pack, packet, booty
   packed  up, fr. L. saccus. See Sack a bag.] the pillage or plunder, as
   of  a  town  or  city;  the  storm and plunder of a town; devastation;
   ravage.

     The  town was stormed, and delivered up to sack, -- by which phrase
     is  to  be  understood the perpetration of all those outrages which
     the  ruthless  code of war allowed, in that age, on the persons and
     property  of  the defenseless inhabitants, without regard to sex or
     age. Prescott.

                                     Sack

   Sack,  v.  t. [imp. & p. p. Sacked (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sacking.] [See
   Sack pillage.] To plunder or pillage, as a town or city; to devastate;
   to ravage.

     The  Romans  lay under the apprehension of seeing their city sacked
     by a barbarous enemy. Addison.

                                    Sackage

   Sack"age  (?;  48), n. The act of taking by storm and pillaging; sack.
   [R.] H. Roscoe.

                                    Sackbut

   Sack"but  (?),  n. [F. saquebute, OF. saqueboute a sackbut. earlier, a
   sort  of  hook attached to the end of a lance used by foot soldiers to
   unhorse  cavalrymen;  prop.  meaning,  pull  and  push;  fr.  saquier,
   sachier,  to pull, draw (perhaps originally, to put into a bag or take
   out from a bag; see Sack a bag) + bouter to push (see Butt to thrust).
   The name was given to the musical instrument from its being lengthened
   and  shortened.]  (Mus.) A brass wind instrument, like a bass trumpet,
   so  contrived  that it can be lengthened or shortened according to the
   tone  required;  -- said to be the same as the trombone. [Written also
   sagbut.] Moore (Encyc. of Music).

     NOTE: &hand; The sackbut of the Scriptures is supposed to have been
     a stringed instrument.

                                   Sackcloth

   Sack"cloth`  (?;  115), n. Linen or cotton cloth such a sacks are made
   of;  coarse  cloth;  anciently,  a  cloth or garment worn in mourning,
   distress, mortification, or penitence.

     Gird you with sackcloth, and mourn before Abner. 2 Sam. iii. 31.

     Thus with sackcloth I invest my woe. Sandys.

                                  sackclothed

   sack"clothed` (?), a. Clothed in sackcloth.

                                    Sacker

   Sack"er  (?),  n.  One  who sacks; one who takes part in the storm and
   pillage of a town.

                                    Sackful

   Sack"ful (?), n.; pl. Sackfuls (. As much as a sack will hold.

                                    Sackful

   Sack"ful, a. Bent on plunder. [Obs.] Chapman.

                                    Sacking

   Sack"ing,  n.  [AS. s\'91ccing, from s\'91cc sack, bag.] Stout, coarse
   cloth of which sacks, bags, etc., are made.

                                   Sackless

   Sack"less,  a.  [AS. sacle\'a0s; sacu contention + le\'a0s loose, free
   from.] Quiet; peaceable; harmless; innocent. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]

                                  Sack-winged

   Sack"-winged`  (?),  a.  (Zo\'94l.)  Having a peculiar pouch developed
   near  the front edge of the wing; -- said of certain bats of the genus
   Saccopteryx.

                                    Sacque

   Sacque  (?), n. [Formed after the analogy of the French. See 2d Sack.]
   Same as 2d Sack, 3.

                                    Sacral

   Sa"cral  (?), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sacrum; in the region
   of the sacrum.

                                   Sacrament

   Sac"ra*ment  (?),  n.  [L.  sacramentum  an  oath,  a  sacred thing, a
   mystery,  a sacrament, fr. sacrare to declare as sacred, sacer sacred:
   cf. F. sacrament. See Sacred.]

   1.  The  oath  of  allegiance taken by Roman soldiers; hence, a sacred
   ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath.
   [Obs.]

     I'll take the sacrament on't. Shak.

   2.  The pledge or token of an oath or solemn cobenant; a sacred thing;
   a mystery. [Obs.]

     God sometimes sent a light of fire, and pillar of a cloud . . . and
     the  sacrament  of  a  rainbow,  to  guide his people through their
     portion of sorrows. Jer. Taylor.

   3. (Theol.) One of the solemn religious ordinances enjoined by Christ,
   the  head  of  the  Christian church, to be observed by his followers;
   hence,  specifically,  the  eucharist;  the  Lord's  Supper.  Syn.  --
   Sacrament,  Eucharist.  --  Protestants  apply  the  term sacrament to
   baptism and the Lord's Supper, especially the latter. The R. Cath. and
   Greek   churches  have  five  other  sacraments,  viz.,  confirmation,
   penance,  holy  orders,  matrimony,  and extreme unction. As sacrament
   denotes  an  oath or vow, the word has been applied by way of emphasis
   to  the  Lord's  Supper, where the most sacred vows are renewed by the
   Christian  in  commemorating  the  death  of  his  Redeemer. Eucharist
   denotes  the  giving of thanks; and this term also has been applied to
   the same ordinance, as expressing the grateful remembrance of Christ's
   sufferings  and  death.  "Some  receive  the  sacrament  as a means to
   procure  great  graces  and  blessings;  others as an eucharist and an
   office of thanksgiving for what they have received." Jer. Taylor.

                                   Sacrament

   Sac"ra*ment (?), v. t. To bind by an oath. [Obs.] Laud.

                                  Sacramental

   Sac`ra*men"tal   (?),   a.  [L.  sacramentalis:  cf.  F.  sacramental,
   sacramentel.]

   1. Of or pertaining to a sacrament or the sacraments; of the nature of
   a  sacrament;  sacredly  or  solemny binding; as, sacramental rites or
   elements.

   2. Bound by a sacrament.

     The sacramental host of God's elect. Cowper.

                                  Sacramental

   Sac`ra*men"tal, n. That which relates to a sacrament. Bp. Morton.

                                Sacramentalism

   Sac`ra*men"tal*ism  (?),  n.  The  doctrine  and  use  of  sacraments;
   attashment of excessive importance to sacraments.

                                Sacramentalist

   Sac`ra*men"tal*ist,  n.  One  who  holds  the  doctrine  of  the  real
   objective  presence  of Christ;s body and blood in the holy eucharist.
   Shipley.

                                 Sacramentally

   Sac`ra*men"tal*ly, adv. In a sacrament manner.

                                Sacramentarian

   Sac`ra*men*ta"ri*an    (?),    n.    [LL.   sacramentarius:   cf.   F.
   sacramentaire.]

   1.  (Eccl.)  A  name  given  in  the sixteenth century to those German
   reformers who rejected both the Roman and the Lutheran doctrine of the
   holy eucharist.

   2.   One   who  holds  extreme  opinions  regarding  the  efficacy  of
   sacraments.

                                Sacramentarian

   Sac`ra*men*ta"ri*an, a.

   1. Of or pertaining a sacrament, or to the sacramentals; sacramental.

   2. Of or pertaining to the Sacramentarians.

                                 Sacramenttary

   Sac`ra*ment"ta*ry (?), a.

   1. Of or pertaining a sacrament or the sacraments; sacramental.

   2. Of or pertaining to the Sacramentarians.

                                 Sacramentary

   Sac`ra*men"ta*ry,  n.;  pl.  -ries  (#).  [LL.  sacramentarium: cf. F.
   sacramentaire.]

   1.  An  ancient  book  of  the  Roman Catholic Church, written by Pope
   Gelasius,  and  revised,  corrected,  and  abridged by St. Gregory, in
   which   were  contained  the  rites  for  Mass,  the  sacraments,  the
   dedication  of  churches,  and  other  ceremonies.  There  are several
   ancient books of the same kind in France and Germany.

   2. Same as Sacramentarian, n., 1.

     Papists, Anabaptists, and Sacramentaries. Jer. Taylor.

                                 Sacramentize

   Sac"ra*ment*ize (?), v. i. To administer the sacraments. [R.]

     Both to preach and sacramentize. Fuller.

                                   Sacrarium

   Sa*cra"ri*um (?), n.; pl. -ria (#). [L., fr. sacer sacred.]

   1.  A  sort of family chapel in the houses of the Romans, devoted to a
   special divinity.

   2. The adytum of a temple. Gwilt.

   3. In a Christian church, the sanctuary.

                                    Sacrate

   Sa"crate  (?),  v.  t.  [L. sacratus, p.p. of sacrare. See Sacred.] To
   consecrate. [Obs.]

                                   Sacration

   Sa*cra"tion (?), n. Consecration. [Obs.]

                                     Sacre

   Sa"cre (?), n. See Sakker.

                                     Sacre

   Sa"cre,  v. t. [F. sacrer. See Sacred.] To consecrate; to make sacred.
   [Obs.] Holland.

                                    Sacred

   Sa"cred  (?),  a.  [Originally  p.p.  of  OE. sacren to consecrate, F.
   sacrer,   fr.   L.  sacrare,  fr.  sacer  sacred,  holy,  cursed.  Cf.
   Consecrate, Execrate, Saint, Sextion.]

   1.  Set  apart  by  solemn  religious  ceremony; especially, in a good
   sense, made holy; set apart to religious use; consecrated; not profane
   or common; as, a sacred place; a sacred day; sacred service.

   2.  Relating to religion, or to the services of religion; not secular;
   religious; as, sacred history.

     Smit with the love of sacred song. Milton.

   3.  Designated or exalted by a divine sanction; possessing the highest
   title  to  obedience,  honor,  reverence,  or  veneration; entitled to
   extreme reverence; venerable.

     Such  neighbor  nearness to our sacred [royal] blood Should nothing
     privilege him. Shak.

     Poet  and saint to thee alone were given, The two most sacred names
     of earth and heaven. Cowley.

   4. Hence, not to be profaned or violated; inviolable.

     Secrets of marriage still are sacred held. Dryden.

   5. Consecrated; dedicated; devoted; -- with to.

     A temple, sacred to the queen oflove. Dryden.

   6.  Solemnly devoted, in a bad sense, as to evil, vengeance, curse, or
   the like; accursed; baleful. [Archaic]

     But, to destruction sacred and devote. Milton.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Page 1266

   Society  of  the  Sacred Heart (R.C. Ch.), a religious order of women,
   founded  in  France  in  1800, and approved in 1826. It was introduced
   into  America  in  1817. The members of the order devote themselves to
   the  higher branches of female education. -- Sacred baboon. (Zo\'94l.)
   See  Hamadryas.  --  Sacred  bean (Bot.), a seed of the Oriental lotus
   (Nelumbo  speciosa or Nelimbium speciosum), a plant resembling a water
   lily;  also,  the plant itself. See Lotus. -- Sacred beetle (Zo\'94l.)
   See  Scarab.  --  Sacred  canon.  See  Canon,  n.,  3.  -- Sacred fish
   (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  fresh-water  African  fishes  of the family
   Mormyrid\'91.   Several  large  species  inhabit  the  Nile  and  were
   considered  sacred  by  the  ancient  Egyptians;  especially  Mormyris
   oxyrhynchus.  --  Sacred  ibis. See Ibis. -- Sacred monkey. (Zo\'94l.)
   (a) Any Asiatic monkey of the genus Semnopitchecus, regarded as sacred
   by the Hindoos; especially, the entellus. See Entellus. (b) The sacred
   baboon.  See Hamadryas. (c) The blunder monkey. -- Sacred place (Civil
   Law),  the  place  where  a  deceased  person is buried. Syn. -- Holy;
   divine;   hallowed;   consecrated;   dedicated;   devoted;  religious;
   venerable; reverend. -- Sa"cred*ly (#), adv. -- Sa"cred*ness, n.

                             Sacrific, Sacrifical

   Sacrif"ic (?), Sa*crif"ic*al (?), a. [L. sacrificus, sacrificalis. See
   Sacrifice.] Employed in sacrifice. [R.] Johnson.

                                 Sacrificable

   Sa*crif"ic*a*ble  (?),  a. Capable of being offered in sacrifice. [R.]
   Sir T. Browne.

                                  Sacrificant

   Sa*crif"ic*ant  (?), n. [L. sacrificans, p.pr. See Sacrifice.] One who
   offers a sacrifice. [R.]

                                 Sacrificator

   Sac"ri*fi*ca`tor   (?),  n.  [L.]  A  sacrificer;  one  who  offers  a
   sacrifice. [R.] Sir T. Browne.

                                 Sacrifictory

   Sa*crif"ic*to*ry  (?), n. [Cf. F. sacrificatoire.] Offering sacrifice.
   [R.] Sherwood.

                                   Sacrifice

   Sac"ri*fice  (?; 277), n. [OE. sacrifise, sacrifice, F. sacrifice, fr.
   L. sacrificium; sacer sacer + facere to make. See Sacred, and Fact.]

   1. The offering of anything to God, or to a god; consecratory rite.

     Great pomp, and sacrifice, and praises loud, To Dagon. Milton.

   2.  Anything  consecrated  and  offered  to  God, or to a divinity; an
   immolated  victin,  or an offering of any kind, laid upon an altar, or
   otherwise  presented  in the way of religious thanksgiving, atonement,
   or conciliation.

     Moloch,  horrid  king,  besmeared  with  blood  Of human sacrifice.
     Milton.

     My  life,  if  thou  preserv's  my  life,  Thy  sacrifice shall be.
     Addison.

   3.  Destruction  or  surrender  of  anything for the sake of something
   else;  devotion of some desirable object in behalf of a higher object,
   or  to a claim deemed more pressing; hence, also, the thing so devoted
   or given up; as, the sacrifice of interest to pleasure, or of pleasure
   to interest.

   4.  A  sale  at  a  price  less  than  the  cost  or the actual value.
   [Tradesmen's Cant]
   Burnt  sacrifice.  See  Burnt  offering, under Burnt. -- Sacrifice hit
   (Baseball), in batting, a hit of such a kind that the batter loses his
   chance  of  tallying,  but enables one or more who are on bases to get
   home or gain a base.

                                   Sacrifice

   Sac"ri*fice  (?;  277), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sacrificed (; p. pr. & vb.
   n.   Sacrificing  (.]  [From  Sacrifice,  n.:  cf.  F.  sacrifier,  L.
   sacrificare; sacer sacred, holy + -ficare (only in comp.) to make. See
   -fy.]

   1.  To  make an offering of; to consecrate or present to a divinity by
   way  of  expiation  or  propitiation,  or as a token acknowledgment or
   thanksgiving;  to  immolate on the altar of God, in order to atone for
   sin, to procure favor, or to express thankfulness; as, to sacrifice an
   ox or a sheep.

     Oft sacrificing bullock, lamb, or kid. Milton.

   2. Hence, to destroy, surrender, or suffer to be lost, for the sake of
   obtaining  something;  to  give  up  in  favor  of  a  higher  or more
   imperative object or duty; to devote, with loss or suffering.

     Condemned  to  sacrifice  his childish years To babbling ignorance,
     and to empty fears. Prior.

     The  Baronet had sacrificed a large sum . . . for the sake of . . .
     making this boy his heir. G. Eliot.

   3. To destroy; to kill. Johnson.

   4.  To  sell  at  a  price  less  than  the  cost or the actual value.
   [Tradesmen's Cant]

                                   Sacrifice

   Sac"ri*fice,  v. i. To make offerings to God, or to a deity, of things
   consumed on the altar; to offer sacrifice.

     O  teacher, some great mischief hath befallen To that meek man, who
     well had sacrificed. Milton.

                                  Sacrificer

   Sac"ri*fi`cer (?), n. One who sacrifices.

                                  Sacrificial

   Sac`ri*fi"cial  (?),  a.  Of or pertaining to sacrifice or sacrifices;
   consisting  in  sacrifice;  performing sacrifice. "Sacrificial rites."
   Jer. Taylor.

                                   Sacrilege

   Sac"ri*lege  (?), n. [F. sacril\'8age, L. sacrilegium, from sacrilegus
   that  steals,  properly,  gathers  or  picks  up, sacred things; sacer
   sacred  +  legere to gather, pick up. See Sacred, and Legend.] The sin
   or  crime  of  violating or profaning sacred things; the alienating to
   laymen,   or  to  common  purposes,  what  has  been  appropriated  or
   consecrated to religious persons or uses.

     And  the  hid  treasures  in her sacred tomb With sacrilege to dig.
     Spenser.

     Families  raised  upon the ruins of churches, and enriched with the
     spoils of sacrilege. South.

                                 Sacrilegious

   Sac`ri*le"gious (?), a. [From sacrilege: cf. L. sacrilegus.] Violating
   sacred  things; polluted with sacrilege; involving sacrilege; profane;
   impious.

     Above the reach of sacrilegious hands. pope.

   -- Sac`ri*le"gious*ly, adv. -- Sac`ri*le"gious*ness, n.

                                  Sacrilegist

   Sac"ri*le`gist (?), n. One guilty of sacrilege.

                                    Sacring

   Sac"ring  (?),  a.  &  n.  from Sacre. Sacring bell. See Sanctus bell,
   under Sanctus.

                                    Sacrist

   Sa"crist  (?),  n. [LL. sacrista. See Sacristan.] A sacristan; also, a
   person  retained  in  a cathedral to copy out music for the choir, and
   take care of the books.

                                   Sacristan

   Sac"ris*tan  (?),  n.  [F. sacristian, LL. sacrista, fr. L. sacer. See
   Sacred,  and cf. Sexton.] An officer of the church who has the care of
   the utensils or movables, and of the church in general; a sexton.

                                   Sacristy

   Sac"ris*ty  (?), n.; pl. Sacristies (#). [F. sacristie, LL. sacristia,
   fr.  L.  sacer.  See Sacred.] A apartment in a church where the sacred
   utensils, vestments, etc., are kept; a vestry.

                                    Sacro-

   Sa"cro-  (.  (Anat.)  A  combining  form  denoting connection with, or
   relation   to,   the  sacrum,  as  in  sacro-coccyageal,  sacro-iliac,
   sacrosciatic.

                                  Sacrosanct

   Sac"ro*sanct  (?),  a. [L. sucrosanctus.] Sacred; inviolable. [R.] Dr.
   H. More.

                                 Sacrosciatic

   Sa`cro*sci*at"ic  (?),  a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to both the sacrum
   and  the  hip; as, the sacrosciatic formina formed by the sacrosciatic
   ligaments which connect the sacrum and hip bone.

                                Sacrovertebral

   Sa`cro*ver"te*bral  (?), a. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sacrum and
   that  part of the vertebral column immediately anterior to it; as, the
   sacrovertebral angle.

                                    sacrum

   sa"crum (?), n.; pl. sacra (. [NL., fr. L. sacer sacred, os sacrum the
   lowest  bone  of the spine.] (Anat.) That part of the vertebral column
   which is directly connected with, or forms a part of, the pelvis.

     NOTE: &hand; It may consist of a single vertebra or of several more
     or  less  consolidated.  In  man it forms the dorsal, or posterior,
     wall  of the pelvis, and consists of five united vertebr\'91, which
     diminish  in  size  very  rapidly to the posterior extremity, which
     bears the coccyx.

                                     Sacs

   Sacs  (?),  n.  pl.; sing. Sac (. (Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians, which,
   together with the Foxes, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay,
   Wisconsin. [Written also Sauks.]

                                      Sad

   Sad  (?),  a.  [Compar. Sadder (?); supperl. Saddest.] [OE. sad sated,
   tired,  satisfied,  firm, steadfast, AS. s\'91d satisfied, sated; akin
   to  D.  zat,  OS.  sad,  G. tt, OHG. sat, sa, saddr, Goth. saps, Lith.
   sotus,  L. sat, satis, enough, satur sated, Gr. Assets, Sate, Satiate,
   Satisfy Satire.]

   1. Sated; satisfied; weary; tired. [Obs.]

     Yet  of  that  art  they  can  not waxen sad, For unto them it is a
     bitter sweet. Chaucer.

   2.  Heavy;  weighty;  ponderous;  close;  hard. [Obs., except in a few
   phrases; as, sad bread.]

     His hand, more sad than lump of lead. Spenser.

     Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad. Mortimer.

   3.  Dull;  grave;  dark;  somber;  --  said  of  colors.  "Sad-colored
   clothes." Walton.

     Woad,  or  wade,  is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of all
     sad colors. Mortimer.

   4.  Serious;  grave;  sober; steadfast; not light or frivolous. [Obs.]
   "Ripe and sad courage." Bacon.

     Which treaty was wisely handled by sad and discrete counsel of both
     parties. Ld. Berners.

   5.  Affected  with  grief  or  unhappiness; cast down with affliction;
   downcast; gloomy; mournful.

     First were we sad, fearing you would not come; Now sadder, that you
     come so unprovided. Shak.

     The angelic guards ascended, mute and sad. Milton.

   6.  Afflictive;  calamitous; causing sorrow; as, a sad accident; a sad
   misfortune.

   7.  Hence,  bad;  naughty;  troublesome;  wicked. [Colloq.] "Sad tipsy
   fellows, both of them." I. Taylor.

     NOTE: &hand; Sa  d is   so  metimes us  ed in   th e fo rmation of 
     self-explaining  compounds; as, sad-colored, sad-eyed, sad-hearted,
     sad-looking, and the like.

   Sad  bread,  heavy  bread.  [Scot.  &  Local,  U.S.] Bartlett. Syn. --
   Sorrowful; mournful; gloomy; dejected; depressed; cheerless; downcast;
   sedate; serious; grave; grievous; afflictive; calamitous.

                                      Sad

   Sad, v. t. To make sorrowful; to sadden. [Obs.]

     How it sadded the minister's spirits! H. Peters.

                                     Sadda

   Sad"da  (?), n. [Per. sad-dar the hundred gates or ways; sad a hundred
   + dar door, way.] A work in the Persian tongue, being a summary of the
   Zend-Avesta, or sacred books.

                                    Sadden

   Sad"den  (?),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  Saddened (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Saddening.]  To  make  sad.  Specifically:  (a)  To  render  heavy  or
   cohesive. [Obs.]

     Marl  is  binding,  and saddening of land is the great prejudice it
     doth to clay lands. Mortimer.

   (b)  To  make  dull-  or  sad-colored,  as cloth. (c) To make grave or
   serious; to make melancholy or sorrowful.

     Her gloomy presence saddens all the scene. Pope.

                                    Sadden

   Sad"den, v. i. To become, or be made, sad. Tennyson.

                                    Sadder

   Sad"der (?), n. Same as Sadda.

                                    Saddle

   Sad"dle  (?),  n.  [OE. sadel, AS. sadol; akin to D. zadel, G. sattel,
   OHG.  satal,  satul,  Icel. s\'94&edh;ull, Dan. & Sw. sadel; cf. Russ.
   siedlo; all perh. ultimately from the root of E. sit.]

   1.  A  seat  for  a  rider, -- usually made of leather, padded to span
   comfortably  a  horse's  back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's
   feet  to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for
   the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.

   2.  A  padded part of a harness which is worn on a horse's back, being
   fastened in place with a girth. It serves various purposes, as to keep
   the breeching in place, carry guides for the reins, etc.

   3. A piece of meat containing a part of the backbone of an animal with
   the ribs on each side; as, a saddle of mutton, of venison, etc.

   4.  (Naut.) A block of wood, usually fastened to some spar, and shaped
   to receive the end of another spar.

   5.  (Mach.)  A  part, as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a
   convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support.

   6. (Zo\'94l.) The clitellus of an earthworm.

   7.  (Arch.)  The  threshold  of a door, when a separate piece from the
   floor  or  landing; -- so called because it spans and covers the joint
   between two floors.
   Saddle  bar  (Arch.), one the small iron bars to which the lead panels
   of  a  glazed window are secured. Oxf. Gloss. -- Saddle gall (Far.), a
   sore or gall upon a horse's back, made by the saddle. -- Saddle girth,
   a  band  passing  round  the body of a horse to hold the saddle in its
   place.  -- saddle horse, a horse suitable or trained for riding with a
   saddle.  --  Saddle  joint,  in sheet-metal roofing, a joint formed by
   bending  up  the  edge  of  a  sheet  and folding it downward over the
   turned-up  edge  of  the  next  sheet.  -- Saddle roof (Arch.), a roof
   having  two  gables and one ridge; -- said of such a roof when used in
   places  where  a different form is more common; as, a tower surmounted
   by  a  saddle  roof.  Called  also  saddleback  roof.  -- Saddle shell
   (Zo\'94l.), any thin plicated bivalve shaell of the genera Placuna and
   Anomia; -- so called from its shape. Called also saddle oyster.

                                    Saddle

   Sad"dle (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saddled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Saddling
   (?).] [AS. sadelian.]

   1.  To  put  a  saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding. "saddle my
   horse." Shak.

     Abraham rose up early saddled his ass. Gen. xxii. 3.

   2. Hence: To fix as a charge or burden upon; to load; to encumber; as,
   to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways.

                                  Saddleback

   Sad"dle*back`  (?), a. Same as Saddle-backed. Saddleback roof. (Arch.)
   See Saddle roof, under Saddle.

                                  Saddleback

   Sad"dle*back`, n.

   1.  Anything  saddle-backed;  esp.,  a  hill or ridge having a concave
   outline at the top.

   2. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The harp seal. (b) The great blackbacked gull (Larus
   marinus).  (c)  The larva of a bombycid moth (Empretia stimulea) which
   has a large, bright green, saddle-shaped patch of color on the back.

                                 Saddle-backed

   Sad"dle-backed` (?), a.

   1.  Having  the  outline  of the upper part concave like the seat of a
   saddle.

   2. Having a low back and high neck, as a horse.

                                  Saddlebags

   Sad"dle*bags (?), n. pl. Bags, usually of leather, united by straps or
   a  band,  formerly  much  used  by  horseback  riders  to  carry small
   articles, one bag hanging on each side.

                                   Saddlebow

   Sad"dle*bow`  (?),  n.  [AS.  sadelboga.] The bow or arch in the front
   part of a saddle, or the pieces which form the front.

                                  Saddlecloth

   Sad"dle*cloth`  (?; 115), n. A cloth under a saddle, and extending out
   behind; a housing.

                                    Saddled

   Sad"dled  (?),  a. (Zo\'94l.) Having a broad patch of color across the
   back, like a saddle; saddle-backed.

                                    Saddler

   Sad"dler (?), n. .One who makes saddles.

   2. (Zo\'94l.) A harp seal.

                                   Saddlery

   Sad"dler*y (?), n.

   1.  The  materials  for  making  saddles  and  harnesses; the articles
   usually offered for sale in a saddler's shop.

   2. The trade or employment of a saddler.

                                 Saddle-shaped

   Sad"dle-shaped` (?), a. Shaped like a saddle. Specifically: (a) (Bot.)
   Bent  down  at  the sides so as to give the upper part a rounded form.
   Henslow. (b) (Geol.) Bent on each side of a mountain or ridge, without
   being broken at top; -- said of strata.

                                  Saddletree

   Sad"dle*tree` (?), n. The frame of a saddle.

     For saddletree scarce reached had he, His journey to begin. Cowper.

                                   Sadducaic

   Sad`du*ca"ic  (?;  135), a. Pertaining to, or like, the Sadducees; as,
   Sadducaic reasonings.

                                   Sadducee

   Sad"du*cee  (?),  n.  [L.  Sadducaei, p., Gr. Tsadd&umac;k\'c6m; -- so
   called  from  Ts\'bed&omac;k,  the founder of the sect.] One of a sect
   among  the  ancient Jews, who denied the resurrection, a future state,
   and the existence of angels. -- Sad`du*ce"an (#), a.

                            Sadduceeism, Sadducism

   Sad"du*cee`ism (?), Sad"du*cism (?), n. The tenets of the Sadducees.

                                   Sadducize

   Sad"du*cize  (?),  v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sadducized (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Sadducizing (?).] To adopt the principles of the Sadducees. Atterbury.

                                     Sadh

   Sadh (?), n. [Skr. s\'bedhu perfect, pure.] A member of a monotheistic
   sect  of Hindoos. Sadhs resemble the Quakers in many respects. Balfour
   (cyc. of India).

                                    Sadiron

   Sad"i`ron  (?),  n. [Probably sad heavy + iron.] An iron for smoothing
   clothes; a flatiron.

                                     Sadly

   Sad"ly, adv.

   1. Wearily; heavily; firmly. [Obs.]

     In go the spears full sadly in arest. Chaucer.

   2. Seriously; soberly; gravely. [Obs.]

     To tell thee sadly, shepherd, without blame Or our neglect, we lost
     her as we came. Milton.

   3.  Grievously;  deeply;  sorrowfully; miserably. "He sadly suffers in
   their grief." Dryden.

                                    Sadness

   Sad"ness, n.

   1. Heaviness; firmness. [Obs.]

   2. Seriousness; gravity; discretion. [Obs.]

     Her sadness and her benignity. Chaucer.

   3.  Quality  of  being  sad,  or  unhappy;  gloominess; sorrowfulness;
   dejection.

     Dim sadness did not spare That time celestial visages. Milton.

   Syn. -- Sorrow; heaviness; dejection. See Grief.

                                     Sadr

   Sadr  (?),  n.  (Bot.) A plant of the genus Ziziphus (Z. lotus); -- so
   called  by  the  Arabs  of  Barbary, who use its berries for food. See
   Lotus (b).

                                  Saengerfest

   Saeng"er*fest  (?),  n.  [G.  s\'84ngerfest.] A festival of singers; a
   German singing festival.
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   Page 1267

                                     Safe

   Safe  (?), a. [Compar. Safer (?); superl. Safest.] [OE. sauf, F. sauf,
   fr.  L.  salvus,  akin  to  salus health, welfare, safety. Cf. Salute,
   Salvation, Sage a plant, Save, Salvo an exception.]

   1.  Free  from  harm,  injury,  or  risk; untouched or unthreatened by
   danger  or  injury;  unharmed;  unhurt;  secure;  whole; as, safe from
   disease;  safe  from  storms; safe from foes. "And ye dwelled safe." 1
   Sam. xii. 11.

     They escaped all safe all safe to land. Acts xxvii. 44.

     Established in a safe, unenvied throne. Milton.

   2.  Conferring  safety;  securing  from  harm; not exposing to danger;
   confining  securely;  to  be  relied  upon;  not dangerous; as, a safe
   harbor; a safe bridge, etc. "The man of safe discretion." Shak.

     The King of heaven hath doomed This place our dungeon, not our safe
     retreat. Milton.

   3.  Incapable  of  doing  harm; no longer dangerous; in secure care or
   custody; as, the prisoner is safe.

     But  Banquo's  safe?  Ay,  my  good lord, safe in a ditch he bides.
     Shak.

   Safe  hit  (Baseball),  a hit which enables the batter to get to first
   base  even  if  no  error  is made by the other side.<-- safe house, a
   residence  where  a  person  in  hiding  from the authorities or other
   persons  may  stay  without  being  discovered.  -->  Syn.  -- Secure;
   unendangered; sure.

                                     Safe

   Safe (?), n. A place for keeping things in safety. Specifically: (a) A
   strong and fireproof receptacle (as a movable chest of steel, etc., or
   a  closet  or  vault  of brickwork) for money, valuable papers, or the
   like.  (b)  A  ventilated or refrigerated chest or closet for securing
   provisions from noxious animals or insects.

                                     Safe

   Safe, v. t. To render safe; to make right. [Obs.] Shak.

                                 Safe-conduct

   Safe"-con"duct  (?),  n.  [Safe  + conduct: cf. F. sauf-conduit.] That
   which gives a safe, passage; either (a) a convoy or guard to protect a
   person  in  an enemy's country or a foreign country, or (b) a writing,
   pass,  or  warrant  of  security,  given  to a person to enable him to
   travel with safety. Shak.

                                 Safe-conduct

   Safe`-con*duct" (?), v. t. To conduct safely; to give safe-conduct to.
   [POetic]

     He  him by all the bonds of love besought To safe-conduct his love.
     Spenser.

                                   Safequard

   Safe"quard` (?), n. [Safe = quard: cf. F. sauvegarde.]

   1.  One  who, or that which, defends or protects; defense; protection.
   Shak.

     Thy sword, the safequard of thy brother's throne. Granwille.

   2. A convoy or quard to protect a traveler or property.

   3. A pass; a passport; a safe-conduct. Shak.

                                   Safequard

   Safe"quard`, v. t. To quard; to protect. Shak.

                                 Safe-keeping

   Safe"-keep"ing (?), n. [Safe + keep.] The act of keeping or preserving
   in safety from injury or from escape; care; custody.

                                    Safely

   Safe"ly,  adv.  In  a  safe  manner;  danger,  injury,  loss,  or evil
   consequences.

                                   Safeness

   Safe"ness, n. The quality or state of being safe; freedom from hazard,
   danger,  harm,  or  loss;  safety;  security;  as  the  safeness of an
   experiment, of a journey, or of a possession.

                                  Safe-pledge

   Safe"-pledge" (?), n. (Law) A surety for the appearance of a person at
   a given time. Bracton.

                                    Safety

   Safe"ty (?), n. [Cf. F. sauvet\'82.]

   1.  The  condition  or  state  of  being  safe; freedom from danger or
   hazard; exemption from hurt, injury, or loss.

     Up led by thee, Into the heaven I have presumed, An earthly guest .
     .  .  With like safety guided down, Return me to my native element.
     Milton.

   2.  Freedom  from  whatever  exposes one to danger or from libility to
   cause  danger  or harm; safeness; hence, the quality of making safe or
   secure,  or  of  giving confidence, justifying trust, insuring against
   harm or loss, etc.

     Would there were any safety in thy sex, That I might put a thousand
     sorrows off. Beau. & Fl.

   3. Preservation from escape; close custody.

     Imprison him, . . . Deliver him to safety; and return. Shak.

   4. (Football) Same as Safety touchdown, below.
   Safety arch (Arch.), a discharging arch. See under Discharge, v. t. --
   Safety belt, a belt made of some buoyant material, or which is capable
   of  being inflated, so as to enable a person to float in water; a life
   preserver.  --  Safety  buoy,  a  buoy  to enable a person to float in
   water;  a  safety belt. -- Safety cage (Mach.), a cage for an elevator
   or  mine  lift,  having  appliances to prevent it from dropping if the
   lifting rope should break. -- Safety lamp. (Mining) See under Lamp. --
   Safety match, a match which can be ignited only on a surface specially
   prepared  for  the purpose. -- Safety pin, a pin made in the form of a
   clasp,  with  a guard covering its point so that it will not prick the
   wearer.  --  safety  plug.  See Fusible plug, under Fusible. -- Safety
   switch.  See Switch. -- Safety touchdown (Football), the act or result
   of  a  player's touching to the ground behind his own goal line a ball
   which  received  its  last  impulse  from  a  man  on his own side; --
   distinguished  from  touchback.  See Touchdown.<-- also called safety.
   --> -- Safety tube (Chem.), a tube to prevent explosion, or to control
   delivery  of  gases by an automatic valvular connection with the outer
   air;  especially,  a  bent  funnel  tube  with  bulbs for adding those
   reagents  which  produce unpleasant fumes or violent effervescence. --
   Safety  valve,  a  valve  which is held shut by a spring or weight and
   opens  automatically  to  permit the escape of steam, or confined gas,
   water, etc., from a boiler, or other vessel, when the pressure becomes
   too  great for safety; also, sometimes, a similar valve opening inward
   to  admit  air  to a vessel in which the pressure is less than that of
   the atmosphere, to prevent collapse.

                                    Safflow

   Saf"flow (?), n. (Bot.) The safflower. [Obs.]

                                   Safflower

   Saf"flow`er  (?),  n.  [F.  safeur,  safior, for safran, influenced by
   fleur flower. See Saffron, and Flower.]

   1.  (Bot.)  An  annual  composite  plant  (Carthamus  tinctorius), the
   flowers  of which are used as a dyestuff and in making rouge; bastard,
   or false, saffron.

   2. The died flowers of the Carthamus tinctorius.

   3. A dyestuff from these flowers. See Safranin (b).
   Oil  of  safflower,  a  purgative  oil expressed from the seeds of the
   safflower.

                                    Saffron

   Saf"fron  (?; 277), n. [OE. saffran, F. safran; cf. It. zafferano, Sp.
   azafran, Pg. a&cced;afr&atil;o; all fr. Ar. & Per. za' far\'ben.]

   1.  (Bot.)  A  bulbous  iridaceous  plant (Crocus sativus) having blue
   flowers with large yellow stigmas. See Crocus.

   2.  The  aromatic,  pungent,  dried  stigmas, usually with part of the
   stile,  of  the  Crocus  sativus.  Saffron  is used in cookery, and in
   coloring  confectionery,  liquors,  varnishes,  etc., and was formerly
   much used in medicine.

   3.  An  orange  or  deep yellow color, like that of the stigmas of the
   Crocus sativus.
   Bastard  saffron,  Dyer's  saffron.  (Bot.)  See  Safflower. -- Meadow
   saffron  (Bot.),  a  bulbous  plant  (Colchichum autumnate) of Europe,
   resembling  saffron.  --  Saffron wood (Bot.), the yellowish wood of a
   South African tree (El\'91odendron croceum); also, the tree itself. --
   Saffron  yellow, a shade of yellow like that obtained from the stigmas
   of the true saffron (Crocus sativus).

                                    Saffron

   Saf"fron  (?;  277),  a.  Having  the  color of the stigmas of saffron
   flowers; deep orange-yellow; as, a saffron face; a saffron streamer.

                                    Saffron

   Saf"fron,  v.  t. To give color and flavor to, as by means of saffron;
   to spice. [Obs.]

     And  in Latyn I speak a wordes few, To saffron with my predication.
     Chaucer.

                                   Saffrony

   Saf"fron*y  (?),  a.  Having a color somewhat like saffron; yellowish.
   Lord (1630).

                                   Safranin

   Saf"ra*nin  (?),  n. (Chem.) (a) An orange-red dyestuff extracted from
   the saffron. [R.] (b) A red dyestuff extracted from the safflower, and
   formerly  used  in  dyeing wool, silk, and cotton pink and scarlet; --
   called  also Spanish red, China lake, and carthamin. (c) An orange-red
   dyestuff prepared from certain nitro compounds of creosol, and used as
   a substitute for the safflower dye.

                                   Safranine

   Saf"ra*nine  (?  OR ?), n. [So called because used as a substitute for
   safranin.]   (Chem.)   An  orange-red  nitrogenous  dyestuff  produced
   artificailly  by  oxidizing  certain  aniline derivatives, and used in
   dyeing  silk  and wool; also, any one of the series of which safranine
   proper is the type.

                                      Sag

   Sag (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Sagged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sagging (?).]
   [Akin  to  Sw.  sacka  to settle, sink down, LG.sacken, D. zakken. Cf.
   Sink, v. i.]

   1.  To  sink,  in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure,
   below a horizontal line or plane; as, a line or cable supported by its
   ends  sags,  though tightly drawn; the floor of a room sags; hence, to
   lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position; as, a building may
   sag one way or another; a door sags on its hinges.

   2.  Fig.:  To lose firmness or elasticity; to sink; to droop; to flag;
   to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care,
   trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced. [R.]

     the  mind  I  sway  by,  and the heart I bear, Shall never sag with
     doubt nor shake with fear. Shak.

   3. To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.
   To  sag to leeward (Naut.), to make much leeway by reason of the wind,
   sea, or current; to drift to leeward; -- said of a vessel. Totten.

                                      Sag

   Sag, v. t. To cause to bend or give way; to load.

                                      Sag

   Sag, n. State of sinking or bending; sagging.

                                     Saga

   Sa"ga  (?),  n.;  pl.  Sagas (#). [Icel., akin to E. saw a saying. See
   Say,  and  cf.  Saw.]  A  Scandinavian  legend,  or  heroic  or mythic
   tradition,  among the Norsemen and kindred people; a northern European
   popular historical or religious tale of olden time.

     And  then  the  blue-eyed  Norseman told A saga of the days of old.
     Longfellow.

                                   Sagacious

   Sa*ga"cious  (?),  a.  [L.  sagax, sagacis, akin to sagire to perceive
   quickly  or  keenly,  and  probably  to  E.  seek.  See  Seek, and cf.
   Presage.]

   1.  Of  quick  sense perceptions; keen-scented; skilled in following a
   trail.

     Sagacious of his quarry from so far. Milton.

   2.  Hence,  of quick intellectual perceptions; of keen penetration and
   judgment;  discerning  and  judicious;  knowing;  far-sighted; shrewd;
   sage; wise; as, a sagacious man; a sagacious remark.

     Instinct  .  .  .  makes  them,  many  times,  sagacious  above our
     apprehension. Dr. H. More.

     Only  sagacious  heads light on these observations, and reduce them
     into general propositions. Locke.

   Syn. -- See Shrewd. -- Sa*ga"cious*ly, adv. -- Sa-ga"cious*ness, n.

                                   Sagacity

   Sa*gac"i*ty  (?),  n.  [L.  sagacitas.  See Sagacious.] The quality of
   being sagacious; quickness or acuteness of sense perceptions; keenness
   of discernment or penetration with soundness of judgment; shrewdness.

     Some [brutes] show that nice sagacity of smell. Cowper.

     Natural sagacity improved by generous education. V. Knox.

   Syn.   --   Penetration;   shrewdness;   judiciousness.  --  Sagacity,
   Penetration.  Penetration  enables  us  to enter into the depths of an
   abstruse  subject,  to  detect  motives,  plans, etc. Sagacity adds to
   penetration  a  keen,  practical  judgment, which enables one to guard
   against  the  designs  of  others,  and to turn everything to the best
   possible advantage.

                                   Sagamore

   Sag"a*more (?), n.

   1.  [Cf.  Sachem.]  The  head of a tribe among the American Indians; a
   chief;  -- generally used as synonymous with sachem, but some writters
   distinguished  between  them,  making  the sachem a chief of the first
   rank,  and a sagamore one of the second rank. "Be it sagamore, sachem,
   or powwow." Longfellow.

   2. A juice used in medicine. [Obs.] Johnson.

                                    Sagapen

   Sag"a*pen (?), n. Sagapenum.

                                   Sagapenum

   Sag`a*pe"num  (?),  n.  [L.  sagapenon, sacopenium, Gr. sagapin, gomme
   sagapin,    sagap\'82num,    Ar.    sikb\'c6naj,   Per.   sakb\'c6nah,
   sikb\'c6nah.]  (Med.)  A  fetid  gum  resin obtained from a species of
   Ferula.  It  has  been  used  in hysteria, etc., but is now seldom met
   with. U. S. Disp.

                                    Sagthy

   Sag"*thy  (?),  n.  [F. sagatis: cf. Sp. sagat\'a1, saet\'a1.] A mixed
   woven  fabric  of  silk and cotton; or silk and wool; sayette; also, a
   light woolen fabric.

                                     Sage

   Sage  (?),  n.  [OE. sauge, F. sauge, L. salvia, from salvus saved, in
   allusion  to  its  reputed  healing  virtues.  See Safe.] (Bot.) (a) A
   suffriticose  labiate  plant  (Salvia  officinalis) with grayish green
   foliage, much used in flavoring meats, etc. The name is often extended
   to the whole genus, of which many species are cultivated for ornament,
   as the scarlet sage, and Mexican red and blue sage. (b) The sagebrush.
   Meadow  sage  (Bot.), a blue-flowered species of salvia (S. pratensis)
   growing  in  meadows  in  Europe. -- Sage cheese, cheese flavored with
   sage,  and  colored  green by the juice of leaves of spanish and other
   plants  which are added to the milk. -- Sage cock (Zo\'94l.), the male
   of  the sage grouse; in a more general sense, the specific name of the
   sage  grouse.  --  Sage green, of a dull grayish green color, like the
   leaves  of  garden  sage.  --  Sage  grouse  (Zo\'94l.),  a very large
   American   grouse  (Centrocercus  urophasianus),  native  of  the  dry
   sagebrush  plains  of  Western  North America. Called also cock of the
   plains. The male is called sage cock, and the female sage hen. -- Sage
   hare, OR Sage rabbit (Zo\'94l.), a species of hare (Lepus Nuttalli, OR
   artemisia)  which  inhabits  the  regions of Western North America and
   lives among sagebrush. By recent writers it is considered to be merely
   a  variety  of  the  common  cottontail,  or  wood rabbit. -- Sage hen
   (Zo\'94l.),  the female of the sage grouse. Sage sparrow (Zo\'94l.), a
   small  sparrow  (Amphispiza  Belli, var Nevadensis) which inhabits the
   dry  plains  of  the Rocky Mountain region, living among sagebrush. --
   Sage  thrasher  (Zo\'94l.), a singing bird (Oroscoptes montanus) which
   inhabits the sagebrush plains of Western North America. -- Sage willow
   (Bot.),  a  species  of willow (Salix tristis) forming a low bush with
   nearly sessile grayish green leaves.

                                     Sage

   Sage  (?),  a. [Compar. Sager (?); superl. Sagest.] [F., fr. L. sapius
   (only  in  nesapius  unwise,  foolish), fr. sapere to be wise; perhaps
   akin to E. sap. Cf. Savor, Sapient, Insipid.]

   1.  Having  nice  discernment  and  powers of judging; prudent; grave;
   sagacious.

     All you sage counselors, hence! Shak.

   2.  Proceeding  from  wisdom; well judged; shrewd; well adapted to the
   purpose.

     Commanders,  who,  cloaking  their  fear under show of sage advice,
     counseled the general to retreat. Milton.

   3.  Grave;  serious;  solemn.  [R.] "[Great bards.] in sage and solemn
   tunes  have  sung." Milton. <-- the "great bards" was moved inside the
   quote  for  consistency.  --> Syn. -- Wise; sagacious; sapient; grave;
   prudent; judicious.

                                     Sage

   Sage,  n.  A  wise man; a man of gravity and wisdom; especially, a man
   venerable  for  years,  and  of  sound  judgment and prudence; a grave
   philosopher.

     At  his  birth a star, Unseen before in heaven, proclaims him come,
     And guides the Eastern sages. Milton.

                                   Sagebrush

   Sage"brush`  (?),  n. A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of
   the  order  Composit\'91,  covering  vast  tracts  of the dry alkaline
   regions  of  the  American  plains;  -- called also sagebush, and wild
   sage.

                                    Sagely

   Sage"ly, adv. In a sage manner; wisely.

                                    Sagene

   Sa*gene"  (?), n. [Russ. sajene.] A Russian measure of length equal to
   about seven English feet.

                                   Sageness

   Sage"ness  (?),  n.  The  quality  or  state  of  being  sage; wisdom;
   sagacity; prudence; gravity. Ascham.

                                   Sagenite

   Sag"e*nite  (?),  n.  [F.  sag\'82nite, fr. L. sagena a large net. See
   Saine.] (Min.) Acicular rutile occurring in reticulated forms imbedded
   in quartz.

                                   Sagenitic

   Sag`e*nit"ic  (?), a. (Min.) Resembling sagenite; -- applied to quartz
   when  containing  acicular  crystals  of other minerals, most commonly
   rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.

                                    Sagger

   Sag"ger (?), n. [See Segger.]

   1.  A  pot  or  case of fire clay, in which fine stoneware is inclosed
   while baking in the kiln; a segga.

   2. The clay of which such pots or cases are made.

                                    Sagging

   Sag"ging  (?), n. A bending or sinking between the ends of a thing, in
   consequence  of its own, or an imposed, weight; an arching downward in
   the middle, as of a ship after straining. Cf. Hogging.

                                   Saginate

   Sag"i*nate  (?),  v.  t.  [L.  saginatus, p.p. of saginare to fat, fr.
   sagina  stuffing.]  To  make  fat;  to  pamper. [R.] "Many a saginated
   boar." Cowper.

                                  Sagination

   Sag`i*na"tion  (?),  n.  [L.  saginatio.]  The  act  of  fettening  or
   pampering. [R.] Topsell.

                                    Sagitta

   Sa*git"ta (?), n. [L., an arrow.]

   1. (Astron.) A small constellation north of Aquila; the Arrow.

   2. (Arch.) The keystone of an arch. [R.] gwitt.

   3.  (Geom.)  The  distance from a point in a curve to the chord; also,
   the  versed  sine  of  an arc; -- so called from its resemblance to an
   arrow resting on the bow and string. [Obs.]

   4. (Anat.) The larger of the two otoliths, or ear bones, found in most
   fishes.

   5.  (Zo\'94l.)  A  genus  of  transparent,  free-swimming marine worms
   having lateral and caudal fins, and capable of swimming rapidly. It is
   the type of the class Ch\'91tognatha.
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   Page 1268

                                   Sagittal

   Sag"it*tal (?), a. [L. sagitta an arrow: cf. F. saguttal.]

   1.  Of  or pertaining to an arrow; resembling an arrow; furnished with
   an arowlike appendage.

   2.  (Anat.) (a) Of or pertaining to the sagittal suture; in the region
   of the sagittal suture; rabdoidal; as, the sagittal furrow, or groove,
   on  the  inner  surface  of  the  roof of the skull. (b) In the mesial
   plane; as, a sagittal section of an animal.
   Sagittal  suture (Anat.), the suture between the two parietal bones in
   the   top   of  the  skull;  --  called  also  rabdoidal  suture,  and
   interparietal suture.

                                  Sagittarius

   Sag`it*ta"ri*us  (?),  n.  [L.,  literally, an archer, fr. sagittarius
   belonging  to an arrow, fr. sagitta an arrow.] (Astron.) (a) The ninth
   of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about November
   22,  marked  thus  [&sagittarius;]  in  almanacs;  the  Archer.  (b) A
   zodiacal  constellation,  represented  on maps and globes as a centaur
   shooting an arrow.

                                   Sagittary

   Sag"it*ta"ry (?), n. [See Sagittarius.]

   1.  (Myth.)  A  centaur; a fabulous being, half man, half horse, armed
   with a bow and quiver. Shak.

   2.  The  Arsenal  in  Venice;  -- so called from having a figure of an
   archer over the door. Shak.

                                   Sagittary

   Sag"it*ta*ry,  a.  [L.  sagittarius.] Pertaining to, or resembling, an
   arrow. Sir T. Browne.

                                   Sagittate

   Sag"it*tate  (?), a. [NL. sagittatus, fr. L. sagitta an arrow.] Shaped
   like  an  arrowhead;  triangular,  with the two basal angles prolonged
   downward.

                                  Sagittated

   Sag"it*ta`ted (?), a. Sagittal; sagittate.

                                  Sagittocyst

   Sag"it*to*cyst (?), n. [See Sagitta, and Cyst.] (Zo\'94l.) A defensive
   cell containing a minute rodlike structure which may be expelled. Such
   cells are found in certain Turbellaria.

                                     Sago

   Sa"go  (?),  n.  [Malay.  s&amac;gu.] A dry granulated starch imported
   from  the East Indies, much used for making puddings and as an article
   of diet for the sick; also, as starch, for stiffening textile fabrics.
   It  is prepared from the stems of several East Indian and Malayan palm
   trees,  but  chiefly  from  the  Metroxylon  Sagu;  also  from several
   cycadaceous   plants   (Cycas  revoluta,  Zamia  integrifolia,  atc.).
   Portland  sago,  a  kind  of  sago  prepared  from  the  corms  of the
   cuckoopint  (Arum  maculatum).  --  Sago  palm. (Bot.) (a) A palm tree
   which  yields  sago.  (b) A species of Cycas (Cycas revoluta). -- Sago
   spleen  (Med.),  a morbid condition of the spleen, produced by amyloid
   degeneration  of  the  organ, in which a cross section shows scattered
   gray translucent bodies looking like grains of sago.

                                    Sagoin

   Sa*goin"  (?),  n.  [F.  sagouin(formed from the native South American
   name).] (Zo\'94l.) A marmoset; -- called also sagouin.

                                     Sagum

   Sa"gum  (?), n.; pl. Saga (#). [L. sagum, sagus; cf. Gr. Say a kind of
   serge.] (Rom. Antiq.) The military cloak of the Roman soldiers.

                                     sagus

   sa"gus (?), n. [NL. See Sago.] (Bot.) A genus of palms from which sago
   is obtained.

                                     Sagy

   Sa"gy (?), a. Full of sage; seasoned with sage.

                                 Sahib, saheb

   Sa"hib  (?),  sa"heb  (,  n.  [Ar.  &cced;\'behib  master,  lord, fem.
   &cced;\'behibah.]  A respectful title or appelation given to Europeans
   of rank. [India]

                                    Sahibah

   Sa"hi*bah (?), n. [See Sahib.] A lady; mistress. [India]

                                    Sahibic

   Sa*hib"ic (?), a. Same as Thebaic.

                                    Sahlite

   Sah"lite (?), n. (Min.) See Salite.

                                     Sahui

   Sa*hui" (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) A marmoset.

                                      Sai

   Sa"i (?), n. [Cf. Pg. sahi.] (Zo\'94l.) See Capuchin, 3 (a).

                                   Saibling

   Sai"bling  (?),  n.  [Dial.  G.]  (Zo\'94l.) A European mountain trout
   (Salvelinus alpinus); -- called also Bavarian charr.

                                     Saic

   Sa"ic (?), n. [F. sa\'8bque, turk. sha\'8bka.] (Naut.) A kind of ketch
   very  common  in  the  Levant,  which  has neither topgallant sail nor
   mizzen topsail.

                                     Said

   Said (?), imp. & p. p. of Say.

                                     Said

   Said,  a. before-mentioned; already spoken of or specified; aforesaid;
   -- used chiefly in legal style.

                                     Saiga

   Sai"ga (?), n. [Russ. saika.] (Zo\'94l.) An antelope (Saiga Tartarica)
   native of the plains of Siberia and Eastern Russia. The male has erect
   annulated horns, and tufts of long hair beneath the eyes and ears.

                                    Saikyr

   Sai"kyr (?), n. (Mil.) Same as Saker. [Obs.]

                                     Sail

   Sail  (?), n. [OE. seil, AS. segel, segl; akin to D. zeil, OHG. segal,
   G. & Sw. segel, Icel. segl, Dan. seil. &root; 153.]

   1.  An  extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is
   made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water.

     Behoves him now both sail and oar. Milton.

   2. Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail.

   3. A wing; a van. [Poetic]

     Like an eagle soaring To weather his broad sails. Spenser

   .

   4. the extended surface of the arm of a windmill.

   5. A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.

     NOTE: &hand; In  th is sense, the plural has usually the same forms
     as the singular; as, twenty sail were in sight.

   6.  A  passage  by  a  sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the
   water.

     NOTE: &hand; Sa ils ar e of  two general kinds, fore-and-aft sails,
     and square sails. Square sails are always bent to yards, with their
     foot  lying  across  the line of the vessel. Fore-and-aft sails are
     set  upon  stays  or gaffs with their foot in line with the keel. A
     fore-and-aft  sail  is  triangular, or quadrilateral with the after
     leech  longer than the fore leech. Square sails are quardrilateral,
     but not necessarily square. See Phrases under Fore, a., and Square,
     a.; also, Bark, Brig, Schooner, Ship, Stay.

   Sail  burton (Naut.), a purchase for hoisting sails aloft for bending.
   --  Sail  fluke (Zo\'94l.), the whiff. -- Sail hook, a small hook used
   in  making  sails,  to  hold the seams square. -- Sail loft, a loft or
   room where sails are cut out and made. -- Sail room (Naut.), a room in
   a vessel where sails are stowed when not in use. -- Sail yard (Naut.),
   the  yard  or  spar on which a sail is extended. -- Shoulder-of-mutton
   sail  (Naut.),  a triangular sail of peculiar form. It is chiefly used
   to set on a boat's mast. -- To crowd sail. (Naut.) See under Crowd. --
   To  loose  sails  (Naut.),  to unfurl or spread sails. -- To make sail
   (Naut.),  to  extend  an additional quantity of sail. -- To set a sail
   (Naut.),  to  extend  or  spread  a  sail  to the wind. -- To set sail
   (Naut.),  to  unfurl or spread the sails; hence, to begin a voyage. --
   To  shorten  sail  (Naut.), to reduce the extent of sail, or take in a
   part.  --  To  strike sail (Naut.), to lower the sails suddenly, as in
   saluting,   or   in  sudden  gusts  of  wind;  hence,  to  acknowledge
   inferiority;  to  abate  pretension.  --  Under sail, having the sails
   spread.

                                     Sail

   Sail  (?),  v.  i. [imp. & p. p. Sailed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sailing.]
   [AS. segelian, seglian. See Sail, n.]

   1.  To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails,
   as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of
   steam or other power.

   2.  To  move  through  or  on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water
   fowl.

   3.  To  be  conveyed  in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they
   sailed from London to Canton.

   4. To set sail; to begin a voyage.

   5.  To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without
   apparent exertion, as a bird.

     As  is  a  winged  messenger of heaven, . . . When he bestrides the
     lazy pacing clouds, And sails upon the bosom of the air. Shak.

                                     Sail

   Sail, v. t.

   1.  To  pass  or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to
   move or journey upon(the water) by means of steam or other force.

     A thousand ships were manned to sail the sea. Dryden.

   2. To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through.

     Sublime she sails The a\'89rial space, and mounts the winged gales.
     Pope.

   3.  To  direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's
   own ship. Totten.

                                   Sailable

   Sail"a*ble  (?),  a.  Capable  of  being sailed over; navigable; as, a
   sailable river.

                                   Sailboat

   Sail"boat`, n. A boat propelled by a sail or sails.

                                   Sailcloth

   Sail"cloth` (?), n. Duck or canvas used in making sails.

                                    Sailer

   Sail"er (?), n.

   1. A sailor. [R.] Sir P. Sidney.

   2.  A  ship  or  other vessel; -- with qualifying words descriptive of
   speed or manner of sailing; as, a heavy sailer; a fast sailer.

                                   Sailfish

   Sail"fish  (?),  n.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a)  The  banner  fish,  or spikefish
   (Histiophorus.)  (b)  The basking, or liver, shark. (c) The quillback.
   <-- Illust. of Sailfish (Histiophorus Americanus) -->

                                    Sailing

   Sail"ing (?), n.

   1. The act of one who, or that which, sails; the motion of a vessel on
   water, impelled by wind or steam; the act of starting on a voyage.

   2.  (Naut.)  The art of managing a vessel; seamanship; navigation; as,
   globular sailing; oblique sailing.

     NOTE: &hand; Fo  r th e se veral me thods of  sa iling, se e un der
     Circular, Globular, Oblique, Parallel, etc.

   Sailing master (U. S. Navy), formerly, a warrant officer, ranking next
   below  a  lieutenant,  whose  duties  were to navigate the vessel; and
   under the direction of the executive officer, to attend to the stowage
   of the hold, to the cables, rigging, etc. The grade was merged in that
   of master in 1862.
   
                                   Sailless
                                       
   Sail"less (?), a. Destitute of sails. Pollok. 

                                   Sailmaker

   Sail"mak`er  (?),  n. One whose occupation is to make or repair sails.
   -- Sail"mak`ing, n.

                                    Sailor

   Sail"or  (?),  n.  One who follows the business of navigating ships or
   other  vessels; one who understands the practical management of ships;
   one  of  the  crew  of  a  vessel; a mariner; a common seaman. Syn. --
   Mariner;   seaman;   seafarer.  Sailor's  choice.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a)  An
   excellent  marine  food fish (Diplodus, OR Lagodon, rhomboides) of the
   Southern   United   States;  --  called  also  porgy,  squirrel  fish,
   yellowtail,   and   salt-water   bream.   (b)   A   species  of  grunt
   (Orthopristis,  OR  Pomadasys,  chrysopterus), an excellent food fish,
   common  on  the  southern  coasts of the United States; -- called also
   hogfish, and pigfish.

                                     Saily

   Sail"y (?), a. Like a sail. [R.] Drayton.

                                     Saim

   Saim (?), n. [OF. sain, LL. saginum, fr. L. sagina a fattening.] Lard;
   grease. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]

                                    Saimir

   Sai*mir" (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) The squirrel monkey.

                                     Sain

   Sain (?), obs. p. p. of Say, for sayen. Said. Shak.

                                     Sain

   Sain,  v. t. [Cf. Saint, Sane.] To sanctify; to bless so as to protect
   from evil influence. [R.] Sir W. Scott.

                                   Sainfoin

   Sain"foin (?; 277), n. [F., fr. sain wholesome (L. sanus; see Sane.) +
   foin  hay  (L.  f\'91num);  or perh. fr. saint sacred (L. sanctus; see
   Saint)  + foin hay.] (Bot.) (a) A leguminous plant (Onobrychis sativa)
   cultivated  for  fodder.  [Written also saintfoin.] (b) A kind of tick
   trefoil (Desmodium Canadense). [Canada]

                                     Saint

   Saint  (?), n. [F., fr. L. santcus sacred, properly p.p. of sancire to
   render  sacred by a religious act, to appoint as sacred; akin to sacer
   sacred. Cf. Sacred, Sanctity, Sanctum, Sanctus.]

   1.  A person sanctified; a holy or godly person; one eminent for piety
   and  virtue;  any true Christian, as being redeemed and consecrated to
   God.

     Them  that  are  sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints. 1
     Cor. i. 2.

   2. One of the blessed in heaven.

     Then  shall  thy saints, unmixed, and from the impure Far separate,
     circling  thy  holy  mount,  Unfeigned  hallelujahs  to  thee sing.
     Milton.

   3. (Eccl.) One canonized by the church. [Abbrev. St.]
   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Page 1269

   --
   Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild, damp weather frequently
   prevailing  during  late  autumn  in  England  and  the  Mediterranean
   countries;  --  so  called  from  St.  Martin's  Festival, occuring on
   November  11.  It  corresponds  to the Indian summer in America. Shak.
   Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under Cross. -- Saint
   Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the death (about 466)
   of  St.  Patrick,  the  apostle  and patron saint of Ireland. -- Saint
   Peter's   fish.  (Zo\'94l.)  See  John  Dory,  under  John.  --  Saint
   Peter's-wort  (Bot.),  a name of several plants, as Hypericum Ascyron,
   H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath (Bot.), a
   shrubby  kind  of  Spir\'91a  (S.  hypericifolia), having long slender
   branches  covered  with clusters of small white blossoms in spring. --
   Saint's  bell. See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint Vitus's dance
   (Med.),  chorea;  --  so  called  from  the  supposed cures wrought on
   intercession to this saint.

                                     Saint

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p.
   Sainted;  p.  pr.  &  vb.  n. Sainting.] To make a saint of; to enroll
   among  the  saints  by an offical act, as of the pope; to canonize; to
   give the title or reputation of a saint to (some one).

     A  large  hospital,  erected by a shoemaker who has been beatified,
     though never sainted. Addison.

   To saint it, to act as a saint, or with a show of piety.

     Whether the charmer sinner it or saint it. Shak.

                                     Saint

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint, v. i. To act or live as
   a saint. [R.] Shak.

                                   Saintdom

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint"dom (?), n. The state or
   character of a saint. [R.] Tennyson.

                                    Sainted

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint"ed, a.

   1. Consecrated; sacred; holy; pious. "A most sainted king." Shak.

     Amongst the enthroned gods on sainted seats. Milton.

   2. Entered into heaven; -- a euphemism for dead.

                                   Saintess

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Saint"ess, n. A female saint.
   [R.] Bp. Fisher.

                                   Sainthood

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint"hood (?), n.

   1. The state of being a saint; the condition of a saint. Walpole.

   2.   The   order,  or  united  body,  of  saints;  saints,  considered
   collectively.

     It  was  supposed  he  felt  no  call  to anu expedition that might
     sainthood. Sir W. Scott.

                                   Saintish

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Saint"ish,  a.  Somewhat
   saintlike; -- used ironically.

                                   Saintism

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Saint"ism  (?),  n.  The
   character  or  quality  of  saints;  also,  hypocritical  pretense  of
   holiness. Wood.

                                   Saintlike

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint"like` (?), a. Resembling
   a saint; suiting a saint; becoming a saint; saintly.

     Glossed over only with a saintlike show. Dryden.

                                  Saintliness

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Saint"li*ness (?), n. Quality
   of being saintly.

                                    Saintly

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought   on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Saint"ly,  a.  [Compar.
   Saintlier  (?);  superl.  Saintliest.]  Like  a saint; becoming a holy
   person.

     So dear to Heaven is saintly chastity. Milton.

                                 Saintologist

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint*ol"o*gist (?), n. [Saint
   + -logy + -ist.] (Theol.) One who writes the lives of saints. [R.]

                                   Saintship

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Saint"ship, n. The character
   or qualities of a saint.

                                Saint-Simonian

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Saint`-Si*mo"ni*an (?), n. A
   follower  of  the  Count  de  St.  Simon,  who  died  in 1825, and who
   maintained that the principle of property held in common, and the just
   division  of  the fruits of common labor among the members of society,
   are the true remedy for the social evils which exist. Brande & C.

                               Saint-Simonianism

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Saint`-Si*mo"ni*an*ism (?), n.
   The  principles,  doctrines,  or  practice  of the Saint-Simonians; --
   called also Saint-Simonism.

                                     Saith

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.> Saith (?), 3d pers. sing.
   pres. of Say. [Archaic]

                                    Saithe

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Saithe  (?),  n.  [Gael.
   saoidheam.]  (Zo\'94l.)  The  pollock,  or  coalfish;  --  called also
   sillock. [Scot.]

                                     Saiva

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.> Sai"va (? OR ?), n. [Skr.
   &cced;aiva  devoted  to  Siva.]  One of an important religious sect in
   India which regards Siva with peculiar veneration.

                                    Saivism

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Sai"vism (?), n. The worship
   of Siva.

                                    Sajene

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sa*jene" (?), n. Same as
   Sagene.

                                     Sajou

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sa"jou (?; F. , n. (Zo\'94l.)
   Same as Sapajou.

                                     Sake

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sake (?), n. [OE. sake cause,
   also, lawsuit, fault, AS. sacu strife, a cause or suit at law; akin to
   D.  zaak  cause,  thing,  affair,  G.  sache thing, cause in law, OHG.
   sahha,  Icel.  s\'94k, Sw. sak, Dan. sag, Goth. sakj strife, AS. sacan
   to contend, strive, Goth. sakan, Icel. saka to contend, strive, blame,
   OHG.  sahhan,  MHG.  sachen,  to  contend, strive, defend one's right,
   accuse,  charge  in  a  lawsuit, and also to E. seek. Cf. Seek.] Final
   cause;  end;  purpose  of  obtaining; cause; motive; reason; interest;
   concern;  account;  regard or respect; -- used chiefly in such phrases
   as,  for the sake, for his sake, for man's sake, for mercy's sake, and
   the  like;  as, to commit crime for the sake of gain; to go abroad for
   the sake of one's health.

     Moved with wrath and shame and ladies; sake. Spenser.

     I  will  not  again  curse the ground any more for man's sake. Gen.
     viii. 21.

     Will he draw out, For anger's sake, finite to infinite? Milton.

     Knowledge  is  for  the  sake  of  man, and not man for the sake of
     knowledge. Sir W. Hamilton.

     NOTE: &hand; Th e -s  of  th e po ssessive ca se pr eceding sake is
     sometimes   omitted  for  euphony;  as,  for  goodness  sake.  "For
     conscience sake." 1 Cor. x. 28. The plural sakes is often used with
     a possessive plural. "For both our sakes." Shak.

                                     Saker

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sa"ker (?), n. [F. sacre (cf.
   It.  sagro,  Sp.  & Pg. sacre), either fr. L. sacer sacred, holy, as a
   translation of Gr. hawk.] [Written also sacar, sacre.]

   1. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A falcon (Falco sacer) native of Southern Europe and
   Asia, closely resembling the lanner.

     NOTE: &hand; Th e fe male is called chargh, and the male charghela,
     or sakeret.

   (b) The peregrine falcon. [Prov. Eng.]

   2. (Mil.) A small piece of artillery. Wilhelm.

     On the bastions were planted culverins and sakers. Macaulay.

     The  culverins  and  sakers  showing  their deadly muzzles over the
     rampart. Hawthorne.

                                    Sakeret

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sa"ker*et (?), n. [F. sacret.
   See Saker.] (Zo\'94l.) The male of the saker (a).

                                     Saki

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to this saint.> Sa"ki (?), n. [Cf. F. & Pg.
   saki;  probably  from  the native name.] (Zo\'94l.) Any one of several
   species  of  South  American  monkeys of the genus Pithecia. They have
   large ears, and a long hairy tail which is not prehensile.

     NOTE: &hand; Th e bl ack sa ki (Pithecia satanas), the white-headed
     (P.leucocephala),   and  the  red-backed,  or  hand-drinking,  saki
     (P.chiropotes), are among the best-known.

                                     Saki

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to this saint.> Sa"ki (?), n. The alcoholic
   drink of Japan. It is made from rice.<-- usu. spelt sake -->

                                     Sakti

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Sak"ti (?), n. [Skr.] (Hind.
   Myth.)  The divine energy, personified as the wife of a deity (Brahma,
   Vishnu, Siva, etc.); the female principle.

                                      Sal

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal (s&add;l), n. [Hind.
   s\'bel,  Skr. &cced;\'bela.] (Bot.) An East Indian timber tree (Shorea
   robusta),  much  used  for  building  purposes. It is of a light brown
   color, close-grained, and durable. [Written also saul.]

                                      Sal

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.> Sal (s&acr;l), n. [L. See
   Salt.]  (Chem.  &  Pharm.)  Salt.  Sal absinthii [NL.] (Old Chem.), an
   impure  potassium  carbonate  obtained  from  the  ashes  of  wormwood
   (Artemisia  Absinthium).  -- Sal acetosell\'91 [NL.] (Old Chem.), salt
   of  sorrel.  --  Sal  alembroth.  (Old  Chem.)  See  Alembroth. -- Sal
   ammoniac  (Chem.),  ammonium  chloride,  NH4Cl,  a  white  crystalline
   volatile  substance  having  a  sharp  salty  taste, obtained from gas
   works,  from  nitrogenous  matter,  etc.  It  is largely employed as a
   source  of ammonia, as a reagent, and as an expectorant in bronchitis.
   So  called  because originally made from the soot from camel's dung at
   the temple of Jupiter Ammon in Africa. Called also muriate of ammonia.
   --  Sal  catharticus  [NL.]  (Old  Med.  Chem.),  Epsom  salts. -- Sal
   culinarius  [L.]  (Old Chem.), common salt, or sodium chloride. -- Sal
   Cyrenaicus.  [NL.]  (Old  Chem.)  See  Sal  ammoniac  above. -- Sal de
   duobus,  Sal  duplicatum  [NL.] (Old Chem.), potassium sulphate; -- so
   called  because  erroneously supposed to be composed of two salts, one
   acid  and  one  alkaline.  --  Sal  diureticus [NL.] (Old Med. Chem.),
   potassium  acetate.  --  Sal  enixum [NL.] (Old Chem.), acid potassium
   sulphate.  --  Sal  gemm\'91  [NL.]  (Old  Min.), common salt occuring
   native. -- Sal Jovis [NL.] (Old Chem.), salt tin, or stannic chloride;
   --  the  alchemical  name  of tin being Jove. -- Sal Martis [NL.] (Old
   Chem.),  green vitriol, or ferrous sulphate; -- the alchemical name of
   iron   being.  Mars.  --  Sal  microcosmicum  [NL.]  (Old  Chem.)  See
   Microcosmic  salt, under Microcosmic. -- Sal plumbi [NL.] (Old Chem.),
   sugar  of  lead. -- Sal prunella. (Old Chem.) See Prunella salt, under
   1st Prunella. -- Sal Saturni [NL.] (Old Chem.), sugar of lead, or lead
   acetate; -- the alchemical name of lead being Saturn. -- Sal sedativus
   [NL.]  (Old Chem.), sedative salt, or boric acid. -- Sal Seignette [F.
   seignette,  sel  de  seignette]  (Chem.),  Rochelle  salt. -- Sal soda
   (Chem.),  sodium  carbonate.  See  under Sodium. -- Sal vitrioli [NL.]
   (Old  Chem.), white vitriol; zinc sulphate. -- Sal volatile. [NL.] (a)
   (Chem.) See Sal ammoniac, above. (b) Spirits of ammonia.

                                    Salaam

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sa*laam" (?), n. Same as
   Salam.

     Finally, Josiah might have made his salaam to the exciseman just as
     he was folding up that letter. Prof. Wilson.

                                    Salaam

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sa*laam", v. i. To make or
   perform a salam.

     I have salaamed and kowtowed to him. H. James.

                                  Salability

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sal`a*bil"i*ty (?), n. The
   quality or condition of being salable; salableness. Duke of Argyll.

                                    Salable

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sal"a*ble (?), a. [From Sale.]
   Capable  of  being  sold;  fit  to be sold; finding a ready market. --
   Sal"a*ble*ness, n. -- Sal"a*bly, adv.

                                   Salacious

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sa*la"cious (?), n. [L. salax,
   -acis,  fond  of  leaping,  lustful, fr. salire to leap. See Salient.]
   Having   a  propensity  to  venery;  lustful;  lecherous.  Dryden.  --
   Sa*la"cious*ly, dv. -- Sa*la"cious*ness, n.

                                   Salacity

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sa*lac"i*ty  (?), n. [L.
   salacitas:  cf.  F.  salacit\'82]  Strong  propensity to venery; lust;
   lecherousness.

                                     Salad

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sal"ad (?), n. [F. salade,
   OIt.  salata,  It.  insalata, fr. salare to salt, fr. L. sal salt. See
   Salt, and cf. Slaw.]

   1.  A  preparation  of  vegetables,  as  lettuce, celery, water cress,
   onions,  etc., usually dressed with salt, vinegar, oil, and spice, and
   eaten  for  giving  a  relish to other food; as, lettuce salad; tomato
   salad, etc.

     Leaves eaten raw termed salad. I. Watts.

   2.  A  dish composed of chopped meat or fish, esp. chicken or lobster,
   mixed  with  lettuce  or  other  vegetables,  and  seasoned  with oil,
   vinegar,  mustard,  and  other  condiments; as, chicken salad; lobster
   salad.<-- mention mayonnaise -->
   Salad   burnet  (Bot.),  the  common  burnet  (Poterium  Sanguisorba),
   sometimes eaten as a salad in Italy.

                                    Salade

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sal"ade (?), n. A helmet. See
   Sallet.

                                   Salading

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Sal"ad*ing (?), n. Vegetable
   for salad.

                                 Sal\'91ratus

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to this saint.> Sal`\'91*ra"tus (?), n. See
   Saleratus.

                                   Salagane

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Sal"a*gane (?), n. [From the
   Chinese name.] (Zo\'94l.) The esculent swallow. See under Esculent.

                                  Salal-berry

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought   on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal"al-ber`ry  (?),  n.
   [Probably  of  American Indian origin.] (Bot.) The edible fruit of the
   Gaultheria   Shallon,   an  ericaceous  shrub  found  from  California
   northwards.  The berries are about the size of a common grape and of a
   dark purple color.

                                     Salam

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sa*lam (s&adot;*l&aum;m"), n.
   [Ar.  sal\'bem  peace, safety.] A salutation or compliment of ceremony
   in the east by word or act; an obeisance, performed by bowing very low
   and placing the right palm on the forehead. [Written also salaam.]

                                  Salamander

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.> Sal"a*man`der (?), n. [F.
   salamandre, L. salamandra, Gr. samander, samandel.]

   1.  (Zo\'94l.)  Any  one  of numerous species of Urodela, belonging to
   Salamandra,   Amblystoma,   Plethodon,   and  various  allied  genera,
   especially those that are more or less terrestrial in their habits.

     NOTE: &hand; The salamanders have, like lizards, an elongated body,
     four  feet,  and a long tail, but are destitute of scales. They are
     true   Amphibia,   related   to  the  frogs.  Formerly,  it  was  a
     superstition  that  the salamander could live in fire without harm,
     and even extinguish it by the natural coldness of its body.

     I  have maintained that salamander of yours with fire any time this
     two and thirty years. Shak.

     Whereas  it  is commonly said that a salamander extinguisheth fire,
     we   have   found  by  experience  that  on  hot  coals,  it  dieth
     immediately. Sir T. Browne.

   2.  (Zo\'94l.) The pouched gopher (Geomys tuza) of the Southern United
   States.

   3.  A  culinary utensil of metal with a plate or disk which is heated,
   and held over pastry, etc., to brown it.

   4. A large poker. [prov. Eng.] Halliwell.

   5. (Metal.) Solidofied material in a furnace hearth.
   Giant  salamander. (Zo\'94l.) See under Giant. -- Salamander's hair OR
   wool (Min.), a species of asbestus or mineral flax. [Obs.] Bacon.

                                 Salamandrina

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sal`a*man*dri"na (?), n.; pl.
   [NL.] (Zo\'94l.) A suborder of Urodela, comprising salamanders.

                                 Salamandrine

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to this saint.> Sal`a*man"drine (?), a. Of,
   pertaining to, or resembling, a salamander; enduring fire. Addison.

                                 Salamandroid

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal`a*man"droid  (?),  a
   [Salamander + -oid.] (Zo\'94l.) Like or pertaining to the salamanders.

                                 salamandridea

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> sal`a*man*dri"de*a (?), n. pl.
   [NL.]  (Zo\'94l.) A division of Amphibia including the Salamanders and
   allied groups; the Urodela.

                                  Salamstone

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sal"am*stone` (? OR ?), n.
   (Min.) A kind of blue sapphire brought from Ceylon. Dana.

                                   Salangana

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sa*lan"ga*na (?), n. The
   salagane.

                                   Salaried

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sal"a*ried (?), a. Receiving a
   salary;  paid  by  a  salary; having a salary attached; as, a salaried
   officer; a salaried office.

                                    Salary

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought   on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal"a*ry  (?),  a.  [L.
   salarius.] Saline [Obs.]

                                    Salary

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought on intercession to this saint.> Sal"a*ry (?), n.; pl. Salaries
   (#). [F. salarie, L. salarium, originally, salt money, the money given
   to  the  Roman  soldiers  for  salt, which was a part of thir pay, fr.
   salarius belonging to salt, fr. sal salt. See Salt.] The recompense or
   consideration  paid,  or stipulated to be paid, to a person at regular
   intervals  for  services;  fixed  wages,  as  by the year, quarter, or
   month; stipend; hire.

     This is hire and salary, not revenge. Shak.

     NOTE: &hand; Recompense for services paid at, or reckoned by, short
     intervals, as a day or week, is usually called wages.

   Syn. -- Stipend; pay; wages; hire; allowance.

                                    Salary

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Sal"a*ry v. t. [imp. & p. p.
   Salaried (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Salarying (?).] To pay, or agree to pay,
   a  salary  to; to attach salary to; as, to salary a clerk; to salary a
   position.

                                     Sale

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession to this saint.> Sale (?), n. See 1st Sallow.
   [Obs.] Spenser.

                                     Sale

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sale, n. [Icel. sala, sal,
   akin to E.sell. See Sell, v. t.]

   1.  The  act  of  selling;  the transfer of property, or a contract to
   transfer  the  ownership of property, from one person to another for a
   valuable consideration, or for a price in money.

   2. Opportunity of selling; demand; market.

     They shall have ready sale for them. Spenser.

   3.  Public  disposal  to  the  highest bidder, or exposure of goods in
   market; auction. Sir W. Temple.
   Bill  of  sale.  See  under Bill. -- Of sale, On sale, For sale, to be
   bought  or  sold;  offered  to purchasers; in the market. -- To set to
   sale,  to  offer for sale; to put up for purchase; to make merchandise
   of. [Obs.] Milton.

                            Saleable, a., Saleably

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought   on   intercession   to  this  saint.>  Sale"a*ble  (?),  a.,
   Sale"a*bly, adv., etc. See Salable, Salably, etc.

                                     Saleb

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.> Sal"eb (?), n. (Med.) See
   Salep.

                                  Salebrosity

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal`e*bros"i*ty  (?), n.
   Roughness or ruggedness. [Obs.] Feltham.

                                   Salebrous

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal"e*brous  (?), a. [L.
   salebosus,  fr.  salebra  a  rugged  road, fr. salire to leap.] Rough;
   rugged. [Obs.]

                                     Salep

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to this saint.> Sal"ep (?), n. [Ar. sahleb,
   perhaps  a  corruption  of an Arabic word for fox, one Ar. name of the
   orchis  signifying literally, fox's testicles: cf. F. salep.] [Written
   also saleb, salop, and saloop.] The dried tubers of various species of
   Orchis,  and  Eulophia.  It  is  used to make a nutritious beverage by
   treating the powdered preparation with hot water. U. S. Disp.

                                   Saleratus

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sal`e*ra"tus (?), n. [NL. sal
   a\'89ratus;  --  so called because it is a source of fixed air (carbon
   dioxide). See Sal, and and A\'89rated.] (Old Chem.) A\'89rated salt; a
   white  crystalline  substance  having  an alkaline taste and reaction,
   consisting  of  sodium  bicarbonate  (see under Sodium.) It is lagerly
   used  in cooking, with sour milk (lactic acid) or cream of tartar as a
   substitute for yeast. It is also an ingridient of most baking powders,
   and is used in the preparation of effervescing drinks.

                                   Salesman

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sales"man  (?),  n.; pl.
   Salesmen  (#).  [Sale  +  man.]  One  who  sells  anything;  one whose
   occupation is to sell goods or merchandise.

                                  Saleswoman

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.> Sales"wom`an (?), n.; pl.
   Saleswomen   (.   A  woman  whose  occupation  is  to  sell  goods  or
   merchandise.

                                   Salework

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sale"work` (?), n. Work or
   things  made  for  sale;  hence,  work done carelessly or slightingly.
   Shak.

                                    Salian

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this saint.> Sa"lian (?), a. Denoting a
   tribe of Franks who established themselves early in the fourth century
   on the river Sala [now Yssel]; Salic. -- n. A Salian Frank.

                                    Saliant

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on intercession to this saint.> Sa"li*ant (?), a. (Her.) Same
   as Salient.

                                   Saliaunce

   Saint Andrew's cross (a) A cross shaped like the letter X. See Illust.
   4,  under  Cross.  (b)  (Bot.)  A  low  North  American shrub (Ascyrum
   Crux-Andr\'91,  the  petals of which have the form of a Saint Andrew's
   cross.  Gray.  -- Saint Anthony's cross, a T-shaped cross. See Illust.
   6,  under Cross. -- Saint Anthony's fire, the erysipelas; -- popularly
   so  called  because  it  was  supposed  to  have  been  cured  by  the
   intercession  of  Saint  Anthony.  --  Saint Anthony's nut (Bot.), the
   groundnut  (Bunium  flexuosum); -- so called because swine feed on it,
   and  St.  Anthony  was once a swineherd. Dr. Prior. -- Saint Anthony's
   turnip  (Bot.),  the  bulbous  crowfoot, a favorite food of swine. Dr.
   Prior.  --  Saint  Barnaby's  thistle  (Bot.),  a  kind  of  knapeweed
   (Centaurea  solstitialis)  flowering on St. Barnabas's Day, June 11th.
   Dr.  Prior.  --  Saint  Bernard (Zo\'94l.), a breed of large, handsome
   dogs  celebrated  for  strength and sagacity, formerly bred chiefly at
   the  Hospice  of  St. Bernard in Switzerland, but now common in Europe
   and   America.   There  are  two  races,  the  smooth-haired  and  the
   rough-haired.  See  Illust.  under  Dog.  --  Saint Catharine's flower
   (Bot.),  the  plant  love-a-mist.  See under Love. -- Saint Cuthbert's
   beads (Paleon.), the fossil joints of crinoid stems. -- Saint Dabeoc's
   heath  (Bot.),  a heatherlike plant (Dab\'91cia polifolia), named from
   an  Irish  saint.  -- Saint Distaff's Day. See under Distaff. -- Saint
   Elmo's  fire,  a  luminious,  flamelike  appearance, sometimes seen in
   dark,   tempestuous  nights,  at  some  prominent  point  on  a  ship,
   particularly  at  the  masthead  and  the  yardams.  It  has also been
   observed  on  land,  and  is  due to the discharge of electricity from
   elevated  or  pointed objects. A single flame is called a Helena, or a
   Corposant;  a double, or twin, flame is called a Castor and Pollux, or
   a  double Corposant. It takes its name from St. Elmo, the patron saint
   of sailors. -- Saint George's cross (Her.), a Greek cross gules upon a
   field  argent,  the field being represented by a narrow fimbriation in
   the ensign, or union jack, of Great Britain. -- Saint George's ensign,
   a  red  cross  on  a white field with a union jack in the upper corner
   next  the  mast.  It is the distinguishing badge of ships of the royal
   navy of England; -- called also the white ensign. Brande & C. -- Saint
   George's  flag,  a smaller flag resembling the ensign, but without the
   union  jack;  used  as  the  sign  of  the  presence and command of an
   admiral.  [Eng.]  Brande  &  C.  -- Saint Gobain glass (Chem.), a fine
   variety  of soda-lime plate glass, so called from St.Gobain in France,
   where  it  was manufactured. -- Saint Ignatius's bean (Bot.), the seed
   of  a  tree  of  the  Philippines  (Strychnos  Ignatia), of properties
   similar  to the nux vomica. -- Saint Jame's shell (Zo\'94l.), a pecten
   (Vola  Jacob\'91us)  worn  by  piligrims to the Holy Land. See Illust.
   under Scallop. -- Saint Jame's wort (Bot.), a kind of ragwort (Senecio
   Jacob\'91a).  --  Saint  John's  bread.  (Bot.)  See  Carob.  -- Saint
   John's-wort  (Bot.), any plant of the genus Hypericum, most species of
   which have yellow flowers; -- called also John's-wort. -- Saint Leger,
   the name of a race for three-year-old horses run annually in September
   at  Doncaster,  England;  --  instituted in 1776 by Col. St. Leger. --
   Saint Martin's herb (Bot.), a small tropical American violaceous plant
   (Sauvagesia  erecta). It is very mucilaginous and is used in medicine.
   1269  --  Saint  Martin's  summer,  a  season  of  mild,  damp weather
   frequently   prevailing   during   late  autumn  in  England  and  the
   Mediterranean  countries;  --  so  called  from St. Martin's Festival,
   occuring  on  November  11.  It  corresponds  to  the Indian summer in
   America.  Shak. Whitier. -- Saint Patrick's cross. See Illust 4, under
   Cross.  --  Saint Patrick's Day, the 17th of March, anniversary of the
   death  (about  466)  of  St.  Patrick, the apostle and patron saint of
   Ireland.  -- Saint Peter's fish. (Zo\'94l.) See John Dory, under John.
   --  Saint  Peter's-wort (Bot.), a name of several plants, as Hypericum
   Ascyron,  H. quadrangulum, Ascyrum stans, etc. -- Saint Peter's wreath
   (Bot.),  a  shrubby  kind of Spir\'91a (S. hypericifolia), having long
   slender  branches  covered  with  clusters  of small white blossoms in
   spring.  --  Saint's  bell.  See Sanctus bell, under Sanctus. -- Saint
   Vitus's  dance  (Med.),  chorea;  -- so called from the supposed cures
   wrought  on  intercession  to  this  saint.>  Sal"i*aunce (?), a. [See
   Sally.] Salience; onslaught. [Obs.] "So fierce saliaunce." Spenser.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Page 1270

                                     Salic

   Sal"ic  (?),  a. [F. salique, fr. the Salian Franks, who, in the fifth
   century, formed a body of laws called in latin leges Salic\'91.] Of or
   pertaining  to the Salian Franks, or to the Salic law so called. [Also
   salique.] Salic law. (a) A code of laws formed by the Salian Franks in
   the  fifth  century. By one provision of this code women were excluded
   from  the  inheritance of landed property. (b) Specifically, in modern
   times,   a   law   supposed   to  be  a  special  application  of  the
   above-mentioned  provision,  in  accordance with which males alone can
   inherit  the  throne. This law has obtained in France, and at times in
   other countries of Europe, as Spain.

                                  Salicaceous

   Sal`i*ca"ceous  (?),  a.  [L.  salix, -icis, the willow.] Belonging or
   relating to the willow.

                                    Salcin

   Sal"*cin  (?),  n.  [L.  salix,  -icis, a willow: cf. F. salicine. See
   Sallow  the  tree.] (Chem.) A glucoside found in the leaves of several
   species  of willow (Salix) and poplar, and extracted as a bitter white
   crystalline  substance.<--  salicyl alcohol glucoside, salicyl alcohol
   b-D-glucopyranoside,  saligenin  b-D-glucopyranoside,  C13H18O7. It is
   used  in  biochemistry  as  a  standard  substrate  for evaluating the
   potency  of  b-glucosidase  in  enzymatic  preparations. It is also an
   analgesic. -->

                                    Salicyl

   Sal"i*cyl (?), n. [Salicin + -yl.] (Chem.) The hypothetical radical of
   salicylic acid and of certain related compounds.

                                   Salicylal

   Sal"i*cyl`al (?), n. [Salicylic + aldehide.] (Chem.) A thin, fragrant,
   colorless  oil,  HO.C6H4.CHO,  found  in  the  flowers of meadow sweet
   (Spir\'91a),  and  also  obtained  by  oxidation of saligenin, etc. It
   reddens  on  exposure.  Called also salycylol, salicylic aldehyde, and
   formerly salicylous, OR spiroylous, acid.

                                  Salicylate

   Sal"i*cyl`ate (-&asl;t), n. (Chem.) A salt of salicylic acid.

                                   Salicylic

   Sal`i*cyl"ic   (?),   n.  (Chem.)  Pertaining  to,  derived  from,  or
   designating,   an  acid  formerly  obtained  by  fusing  salicin  with
   potassium  hydroxide,  and  now  made  in large quantities from phenol
   (carbolic  acid)  by  the  action  of  carbon dioxide on heated sodium
   phenolate.  It  is  a  white  crystalline  substance. It is used as an
   antiseptic,  and  in  its salts in the treatment of rheumatism. Called
   also hydroxybenzoic acid.

                                  Salicylide

   Sal"i*cyl`ide  (?),  n.  [Salicylic  +  anhydride.]  (Chem.)  A  white
   crystalline substance obtained by dehydration of salicylic acid.

                                  Salicylite

   Sal"i*cyl`ite  (?), n. (Chem.) A compound of salicylal; -- named after
   the analogy of a salt.

                                   Salicylol

   Sal"i*cyl`ol  (?),  n.  [Salicylic  +  L.  oleum oil.] (Chem.) Same as
   Salicylal.

                                  Salicylous

   Sa*lic"y*lous  (?  OR  ?), a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a
   substance called salicylous acid, and now salicylal. [Obs.]

                                   Salience

   Sa"li*ence (?), n. [See Salient.]

   1.  That quality or condition of being salient; a leaping; a springing
   forward; an assaulting.

   2. The quality or state of projecting, or being projected; projection;
   protrusion. Sir W. Hamilton.

                                   Saliency

   Sa"li*en*cy  (?),  n. Quality of being salient; hence, vigor. "A fatal
   lack of poetic saliency." J. Morley.

                                    Salient

   Sa"li*ent (?), a. [L. saliens, -entis, p.pr. of salire to leap; cf. F.
   saillant. See Sally, n. & v. i..]

   1.  Moving by leaps or springs; leaping; bounding; jumping. "Frogs and
   salient animals." Sir T. Browne.

   2. Shooting out up; springing; projecting.

     He  had  in  himself a salient, living spring of generous and manly
     action. Burke.

   3.  Hence,  figuratively,  forcing itself on the attention; prominent;
   conspicuous; noticeable.

     He   [Grenville]   had   neither   salient   traits,   nor  general
     comprehensiveness of mind. Bancroft.

   4.  (Math.  &  Fort.)  Projectiong  outwardly; as, a salient angle; --
   opposed to re\'89ntering. See Illust. of Bastion.<-- convex? -->

   5. (Her.) Represented in a leaping position; as, a lion salient.
   Salient  angle.  See  Salient,  a.,  4.  -- Salient polygon (Geom.), a
   polygon  all  of  whose  angles  are  salient.  --  Salient polyhedron
   (Geom.), a polyhedron all of whose solid angles are salient.

                                    Salient

   Sa"li*ent, a. (Fort.) A salient angle or part; a projection.

                                   Saliently

   Sa"li*ent*ly, adv. In a salient manner.

                                  Saliferous

   Sa*lif"er*ous   (?),  a.  [L.  sal  salt  +  -ferous.]  Producing,  or
   impregnated   with,  salt.  Saliferous  rocks  (Geol.),  the  New  Red
   Sandstone  system of some geologists; -- so called because, in Europe,
   this  formation contains beds of salt. The saliferous beds of New York
   State  belong  largely to the Salina period of the Upper Silurian. See
   the Chart of Geology.
   
                                  Salifiable
                                       
   Sal"i*fi`a*ble  (?),  a.  [Cf.  F.  salifiable.  See  Salify.] (Chem.)
   Capable  of  neutralizing  an  acid  to form a salt; -- said of bases;
   thus, ammonia is salifiable. 

                                 Salification

   Sal`i*fi*ca"tion  (?),  n.  [Cf.  F.  salification.]  (Chem.) The act,
   process, or result of salifying; the state of being salified.

                                    Salify

   Sal"i*fy  (?),  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p. Salified (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Salifying  (?).]  [F.  salifier;  from  L. sal salt + -ficare (only in
   comp.)  to make. See -fy.] (Chem.) (a) To combine or impregnate with a
   salt. (b) To form a salt with; to convert into a salt; as, to salify a
   base or an acid.

                                   Saligenin

   Sa*lig"e*nin  (?),  n.  [Salicin  +  -gen.]  (Chem.)  A phenol alcohol
   obtained,  by  the  decomposition  of  salicin, as a white crystalline
   substance;    --    called    also    hydroxy-benzyl    alcohol.   <--
   ortho-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, saligenol, salicyl alcohol. HOCH2.C6H4.OH
   -->

                                    Saligot

   Sal"i*got (?), n. [F.] (Bot.) The water chestnut (Trapa natans).

                                   Salimeter

   Sal*im"e*ter  (?),  n.  [L.  sal  salt  +  -meter.]  An instrument for
   measuring  the  amount of salt present in any given solution. [Written
   also salometer.]

                                   Salimetry

   Sal*im"e*try  (?),  n.  The  art or process of measuring the amount of
   salt in a substance.

                                    Salina

   Sa*li"na  (?), n. [Cf. L. salinae, pl., salt works, from sal salt. See
   Saline, a.]

   1. A salt marsh, or salt pond, inclosed from the sea.

   2. Salt works.

                                 Salina period

   Sa*li"na  pe"ri*od  (?).  [So called from Salina, a town in New York.]
   (Geol.)  The  period  in  which  the  American  Upper Silurian system,
   containing  the brine-producing rocks of central New York, was formed.
   See the Chart of Geology.

                                  Salination

   Sal`i*na"tion (?), n. The act of washing with salt water. [R. & Obs..]
   Greenhill.

                                    Saline

   Sa"line  (?  OR ?; 277), a. [F. salin, fr. L. sal salt: cf. L. salinae
   salt works, salinum saltcellar. See Salt.]

   1.  Consisting  of  salt,  or  containing  salt; as, saline particles;
   saline substances; a saline cathartic.

   2. Of the quality of salt; salty; as, a saline taste.

                                    Saline

   Sa"line  (?  OR  ?;  277),  n.  [Cf. F. saline. See Saline, a.] A salt
   spring; a place where salt water is collected in the earth.

                                    Saline

   Sal"ine (?), n.

   1.  (Chem.)  A crude potash obtained from beet-root residues and other
   similar sources. [Written also salin.]

   2.  (Med.  Chem.)  A metallic salt; esp., a salt of potassium, sodium,
   lithium, or magnesium, used in medicine. <-- 3. (Med., Biochemistry) A
   saline  solution,  esp.  normal  saline,  or isotonic saline, used for
   infusion, to maintain blood pressure. -->

                                  Salineness

   Sa*line"ness (?), n. The quality or state of being salt; saltness.

                                 Saliniferous

   Sal`i*nif"er*ous (?), a. [Saline + -ferous.] Same as Saliferous.

                                  Saliniform

   Sa*lin"i*form  (?),  a.  Having  the  form or the qualities of a salt,
   especially of common salt.

                                   Salinity

   Sa*lin"i*ty (?), n. Salineness. Carpenter.

                                  Salinometer

   Sal`i*nom"e*ter (?), n. [Saline + -meter.] A salimeter.

                                   Salinous

   Sa*lin"ous (?), a. Saline. [Obs.]

                                    Salique

   Sal"ique (? OR ?), a. [F.] Salic. Shak.

     She fulmined out her scorn of laws salique. Tennyson.

                                   Saliretin

   Sal`i*re"tin  (?),  n.  [Saligenin  +  Gr.  (Chem.) A yellow amorphous
   resinoid   substance  obtained  by  the  action  of  dilute  acids  on
   saligenin.

                                  Salisburia

   Sal`is*bu"ri*a  (?),  n.  [Named  after  R.  A.  Salisbury, an English
   botanist.]  (Bot.)  The  ginkgo  tree  (Ginkgo  biloba,  or Salisburia
   adiantifolia).

                                    Salite

   Sal"ite (?), v. t. [L. salitus, p.p. of salire to salt, fr. sal salt.]
   To season with salt; to salt. [Obs.]

                                    Salite

   Sa"lite  (?),  n.  [So  called  from Sala, a town in Sweden.] (Min.) A
   massive lamellar variety of pyroxene, of a dingy green color. [Written
   also sahlite.]

                                    Saliva

   Sa*li"va  (?),  n.  [L.;  cf.  Gr.  (Physiol.)  The secretion from the
   salivary glands.

     NOTE: &hand; In man the saliva is a more or less turbid and slighty
     viscid fluid, generally of an alkaline reaction, and is secreted by
     the  parotid, submaxillary, and sublingual glands. In the mouth the
     saliva  is  mixed  with  the  secretion from the buccal glands. The
     secretions  from  the  individual  salivary  glands  have their own
     special characteristics, and these are not the same in all animals.
     In  man and many animals mixed saliva, i.e., saliva composed of the
     secretions  of  all  three  of the salivary glands, is an important
     degestive  fluid on account of the presence of the peculiar enzyme,
     ptyalin.

                                    Salival

   Sa*li"val (?; 277), a. Salivary.

                                   Salivant

   Sal"i*vant  (?),  a.  [L.  salivans, p.pr. of salivare. See Salivate.]
   Producing salivation.

                                   Salivant

   Sal"i*vant, n. That which produces salivation.

                                   Salivary

   Sal"i*va*ry  (?),  a. [L. salivarius slimy, clammy: cf. F. salivaire.]
   (Physiol.)  Of  or pertaining to saliva; producing or carrying saliva;
   as,  the  salivary  ferment;  the salivary glands; the salivary ducts,
   etc.

                                   Salivate

   Sal"i*vate  (?),  v.  t.  [imp. & p. p. Salivated (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Salivating.] [L. salivatus, p.p. of salivare to salivate. See Saliva.]
   To  produce  an  abnormal  flow of saliva in; to produce salivation or
   ptyalism  in,  as  by  the use of mercury. <-- v.i. To produce saliva,
   esp.  in  excess.  2.  To  drool.  3. (Fig.) To anticipate keenly with
   pleasure, as though salivating at the expectation of a delicious meal.
   Used often with over.; as, salivate over the prospects of high profits
   from an enterprise.

     NOTE: Probably influenced by the experiments of Pavlov, who trained
     dogs  to salivate at the sound of a bell, by previously ringing the
     bell immediately prior to feeding them.

   -->

                                  Salivation

   Sal`i*va"tion  (?),  n.  [L. salivatio: cf. F. salivation.] (Physiol.)
   The  act  or  process of salivating; an excessive secretion of saliva,
   often accompained with soreness of the mouth and gums; ptyalism.

     NOTE: &hand; It  ma y be  in duced by direct chemical or mechanical
     stimulation,  as  in  mastication  of some tasteless substance like
     rubber, or indirectly by some agent which affects the whole system,
     as mercury compounds.

                                   Salivous

   Sa*li"vous  (?),  a.  [L.  salivosus:  cf. F. saliveux.] Pertaining to
   saliva; of the nature of saliva.

                                     Salix

   Sa"lix  (?), n.; pl. Salices (#). [L., the willow.] (Bot.) (a) A genus
   of  trees or shrubs including the willow, osier, and the like, growing
   usually in wet grounds. (b) A tree or shrub of any kind of willow.

                                  Sallenders

   Sal"len*ders  (?), n. pl. [F. solandres, solandre.] (Far.) An eruption
   on the hind leg of a horse. [Written also sellanders, and sellenders.]

     On  the inside of the hock, or a little below it, as well as at the
     bend  of  the  knee, there is occasionally a scurfy eruption called
     "mallenders"  in  the  fore  leg, and "sallenders" in the hind leg.
     Youatt.

                                    Sallet

   Sal"let (?), n. [F. salade, Sp. celada, or It. celata, fr. L. (cassis)
   caelata,  fr.  caelare, caelatum, to engrave in relief. So called from
   the figures engraved upon it.] A light kind of helmet, with or without
   a visor, introduced during the 15th century. [Written also salade.]

     Then  he  must  have  a  sallet  wherewith  his  head may be saved.
     Latimer.

                               Salet, Salleting

   Sal"et, Sal"let*ing, n. Salad. [Obs.] Shak.

                                   Salliance

   Sal"li*ance (?), n. Salience. [Obs.]

                                    Sallow

   Sal"low  (?),  n.  [OE.  salwe,  AS.  sealth;  akin to OHG. salaha, G.
   salwiede, Icel. selja L. salix, Ir. sail, saileach, Gael. seileach, W.
   helyg, Gr.

   1. The willow; willow twigs. [Poetic] Tennyson.

     And bend the pliant sallow to a shield. Fawkes.

     The sallow knows the basketmaker's thumb. Emerson.

   2.  (Bot.) A name given to certain species of willow, especially those
   which do not have flexible shoots, as Salix caprea, S. cinerea, etc.
   Sallow  thorn  (Bot.),  a European thorny shrub (Hippophae rhamnoides)
   much  like  an  El\'91agnus. The yellow berries are sometimes used for
   making jelly, and the plant affords a yellow dye.

                                    Sallow

   Sal"low, a. [Compar. Sallower (?); superl. Sallowest.] [AS. salu; akin
   to  D.  zaluw,  OHG.  salo,  Icel. s\'94lr yellow.] Having a yellowish
   color; of a pale, sickly color, tinged with yellow; as, a sallow skin.
   Shak.

                                    Sallow

   Sal"low, v. t. To tinge with sallowness. [Poetic]

     July breathes hot, sallows the crispy fields. Lowell.

                                   Sallowish

   Sal"low*ish, a. Somewhat sallow. Dickens.

                                  Sallowness

   Sal"low*ness  (?),  n.  The  quality  or  condition  of  being sallow.
   Addison.

                                     Sally

   Sal"ly  (?),  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  Sallied  (?);  p. pr. & vb. n.
   Sallying.]  [F.  saillir,  fr.  L. salire to leap, spring, akin to gr.
   Sallient, Assail, Assault, Exult, Insult, Saltation, Saltire.] To leap
   or  rush  out;  to burst forth; to issue suddenly; as a body of troops
   from a fortified place to attack besiegers; to make a sally.

     They break the truce, and sally out by night. Dryden.

     The foe retires, -- she heads the sallying host. Byron.

                                     Sally

   Sal"ly, n.; pl. Sallies (#). [F. saillie, fr. sailir. See Sally, v.]

   1. A leaping forth; a darting; a spring.

   2.  A  rushing  or  bursting  forth; a quick issue; a sudden eruption;
   specifically, an issuing of troops from a place besieged to attack the
   besiegers; a sortie.

     Sallies  were  made  by the Spaniards, but they were beaten in with
     loss. Bacon.

   3. An excursion from the usual track; range; digression; deviation.

     Every one shall know a country better that makes often sallies into
     it,  and  traverses  it  up and down, than he that . . . goes still
     round in the same track. Locke.

   4.  A  flight of fancy, liveliness, wit, or the like; a flashing forth
   of a quick and active mind.

     The  unaffected  mirth  with  which she enjoyed his sallies. Sir W.
     Scott.

   5.  Transgression  of  the  limits  of soberness or steadiness; act of
   levity; wild gayety; frolic; escapade.

     The excursion was esteemed but a sally of youth. Sir H. Wotton.

   Sally port. (a) (Fort.) A postern gate, or a passage underground, from
   the  inner  to  the outer works, to afford free egress for troops in a
   sortie.  (b)  (Naval)  A large port on each quarter of a fireship, for
   the escape of the men into boats when the train is fired; a large port
   in an old-fashioned three-decker or a large modern ironclad.

                                  Sally Lunn

   Sal"ly Lunn" (?). [From a woman, Sally Lunn, who is said to have first
   made the cakes, and sold them in the streets of Bath, Eng.] A tea cake
   slighty  sweetened,  and  raised  with  yeast,  baked  in  the form of
   biscuits or in a thin loaf, and eaten hot with butter.

                                   Sallyman

   Sal"ly*man (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) The velella; -- called also saleeman.

                                     Salm

   Salm (?), n. Psalm. [Obs.] Piers plowman.

                                  Salmagundi

   Sal`ma*gun"di  (?),  n.  [F.  salmigondis of uncertain origin; perhaps
   from L. salgama condita, pl.; salgama pickles + condita preserved (see
   Condite);  or  from the Countess Salmagondi, lady of honor to Maria de
   Medici,  who is said to have invented it; or cf. It. salame salt meat,
   and F. salmis a ragout.]

   1.  A  mixture of chopped meat and pickled herring, with oil, vinegar,
   pepper, and onions. Johnson.

   2.  Hence,  a  mixture  of  various  ingredients; an olio or medley; a
   potpourri; a miscellany. W. Irving.

                                     Salmi

   Sal"mi (?), n. (Cookery) Same as Salmis.

                                    Salmiac

   Sal"mi*ac  (?),  n.  [Cf.  F.  salmiac,  G.  salmiak.] (Old Chem.) Sal
   ammoniac. See under Sal.

                                    Salmis

   Sal`mis" (?), n. [F.] (Cookery) A ragout or partky roasted game stewed
   with sauce, wine, bread, and condiments suited to provoke appetite.

                                    Salmon

   Salm"on  (?),  n.;  pl.  Salmons  (#)  or  (collectively) Salmon. [OE.
   saumoun, salmon, F. saumon, fr. L. salmo, salmonis perhaps from salire
   to leap. Cf. Sally, v.]

   1.  (Zo\'94l.) Any one of several species of fishes of the genus Salmo
   and  allied genera. The common salmon (Salmo salar) of Northern Europe
   and  Eastern North America, and the California salmon, or quinnat, are
   the  most  important species. They are extensively preserved for food.
   See Quinnat.

     NOTE: &hand; Th e salmons ascend rivers and penetrate to their head
     streams  to spawn. They are remarkably strong fishes, and will even
     leap  over  considerable  falls  which  lie  in  the  way  of their
     progress. The common salmon has been known to grow to the weight of
     seventy-five   pounds;   more  generally  it  is  from  fifteen  to
     twenty-five  pounds. Young salmon are called parr, peal, smolt, and
     grilse. Among the true salmons are:

   Black  salmon,  or Lake salmon, the namaycush. -- Dog salmon, a salmon
   of  Western North America (Oncorhynchus keta). -- Humpbacked salmon, a
   Pacific-coast  salmon  (Oncorhynchus  gorbuscha).  -- King salmon, the
   quinnat.  --  Landlocked  salmon, a variety of the common salmon (var.
   Sebago), long confined in certain lakes in consequence of obstructions
   that  prevented it from returning to the sea. This last is called also
   dwarf  salmon.  Among  fishes  of other families which are locally and
   erroneously called salmon are: the pike perch, called jack salmon; the
   spotted,  or  southern,  squeteague; the cabrilla, called kelp salmon;
   young pollock, called sea salmon; and the California yellowtail.

   2. A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon.
   Salmon  berry  (Bot.),  a  large  red raspberry growing from Alaska to
   California,  the  fruit  of  the  Rubus  Nutkanus.  --  Salmon  killer
   (Zo\'94l.), a stickleback (Gasterosteus cataphractus) of Western North
   America  and  Northern  Asia. -- Salmon ladder, salmon stair. See Fish
   ladder,  under Fish. -- Salmon peel, a young salmon. -- Salmon pipe, a
   certain device for catching salmon. Crabb. -- Salmon trout. (Zo\'94l.)
   (a)  The  European  sea trout (Salmo trutta). It resembles the salmon,
   but  is  smaller,  and  has  smaller and more numerous scales. (b) The
   American  namaycush.  (c)  A  name that is also applied locally to the
   adult  black  spotted  trout (Salmo purpuratus), and to the steel head
   and other large trout of the Pacific coast.

                                    Salmon

   Salm"on,  a.  Of  a  reddish  yellow or orange color, like that of the
   flesh of the salmon.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Page 1271

                                   Salmonet

   Salm"on*et  (?), n. [Cf. Samlet.] (Zo\'94l.) A salmon of small size; a
   samlet.

                                   Salmonoid

   Sal"mon*oid  (?),  a.  [Salmon + -oid.] (Zo\'94l.) Like, or pertaining
   to,  the  Salmonid\'91,  a  family  of  fishes including the trout and
   salmon. -- n. Any fish of the family Salmonid\'91.

                                    Salogen

   Sal"o*gen (?), n. [L. sal salt + -gen.] (Chem.) A halogen. [Obs.]

                                     Salol

   Sal"ol  (?),  n.  [Salicylic  +  -ol.]  (Chem.)  A  white  crystalline
   substance consisting of phenol salicylate.

                                   salometer

   sa*lom"e*ter (?), n. See Salimeter.

                                   Salomtry

   Sa*lom"*try (?), n. Salimetry.

                                     Salom

   Sa`lom"  (?),  n.  [F.  See Saloon.] An apartment for the reception of
   company;  hence,  in  the  plural,  faschionable  parties;  circles of
   fashionable society.

                                    Saloon

   Sa*loon"  (?),  n.  [F.  salon  (cf. It. salone), fr. F. salle a large
   room,  a hall, of German or Dutch origin; cf. OHG. sal house, hall, G.
   saal;  akin  to AS. s\'91l, sele, D. zaal, Icel. salr, Goth. saljan to
   dwell,  and  probably  to  L. solum ground. Cf. Sole of the foot, Soil
   ground, earth.]

   1.  A  spacious  and elegant apartment for the reception of company or
   for  works  of  art;  a  hall  of  reception,  esp.  a hall for public
   entertainments  or  amusements; a large room or parlor; as, the saloon
   of a steamboat.

     The  gilden  saloons in which the first magnates of the realm . . .
     gave banquets and balls. Macaulay.

   2.  Popularly,  a  public  room  for specific uses; esp., a barroom or
   grogshop; as, a drinking saloon; an eating saloon; a dancing saloon.

     We hear of no hells, or low music halls, or low dancing saloons [at
     Athens.] J. P. Mahaffy.

                                    Saloop

   Sa*loop"  (?),  n.  An aromatic drink prepared from sassafras bark and
   other  ingredients,  at  one time much used in London. J. Smith (Dict.
   econ.  Plants).  Saloop  bush  (Bot.),  an  Australian shrub (Rhagodia
   hastata) of the Goosefoot family, used for fodder.

                                     Salp

   Salp  (?),  n.  (Zo\'94l.)  Any  species  of  Salpa,  or of the family
   Salpid\'91.

                                     Salpa

   Sal"pa (?), n.; pl. L. Salp\'91 (#), E. Salpas (#). [NL.: cf. L. salpa
   a  kind  of  stockfish.]  (Zo\'94l.)  A genus of transparent, tubular,
   free-swimming  oceanic  tunicates  found  abundantly in all the warmer
   latitudes. See Illustration in Appendix.

     NOTE: &hand; Ea ch sp ecies ex ists in  tw o distinct forms, one of
     which  lives  solitary,  and  produces, by budding from an internal
     organ,  a series of the other kind. These are united together, side
     by  side,  so  as to form a chain, or cluster, often of large size.
     Each  of  the individuals composing the chain carries a single egg,
     which develops into the solitary kind.

                                Salpian, Salpid

   Sal"pi*an (?), Sal"pid (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) A salpa.

                                   Salpicon

   Sal"pi*con  (?),  n. [F. salpicon, Sp. salpicon.] Chopped meat, bread,
   etc.,  used  to  stuff  legs of veal or other joints; stuffing; farce.
   Bacon.

                                  Salpingitis

   Sal`pin*gi"tis   (?),   n.   [NL.  See  Salpinx,  and  -itis.]  (Med.)
   Inflammation of the salpinx.

                                    Salpinx

   Sal"pinx  (?),  n.  [NL., from Gr. (Old Anat.) The Eustachian tube, or
   the Fallopian tube.

                                    Salsafy

   Sal"sa*fy (?), n. (Bot.) See Salsify.

                                Salsamentarious

   Sal`sa*men*ta"ri*ous  (?),  a.  [L.  salsamentarius,  fr.  salsamentum
   brine, pickled fish, fr. salsus salted, p.p. of salire to salt.] Salt;
   salted; saline. [R.]

                                     Salse

   Salse  (?),  n.  [F.]  A  mud  volcano,  the  water  of which is often
   impregnated with salts, whence the name.

                                    Salsify

   Sal"si*fy  (?;  277),  n.  [F. salsifis.] (Bot.) See Oyster plant (a),
   under Oyster.

                                  Salso-acid

   Sal"so-ac`id  (?), a. [L. salsus salted, salt + acidus acid.] Having a
   taste compounded of saltness and acidity; both salt and acid. [R.]

                                    Salsoda

   Sal`so"da (?), n. See Sal soda, under Sal.

                                    Salsola

   Sal"so*la  (?),  n.  [NL.,  fr.  L.  salsus salt, because they contain
   alkaline salts.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the glasswort. See
   Glasswort.

                                  salsuginous

   sal*su"gi*nous  (?),  a.  [L.  salsugo,  -ginis,  saltness from salsus
   salted,  salt:  cf. F. salsugineux.] (Bot.) Growing in brackish places
   or in salt marches.

                                     Salt

   Salt (?), n. [AS. sealt; akin to OS. & OFries. salt, D. zout, G. salz,
   Icel.,  Sw.,  &  Dan.  salt,  L. sal, Gr. sole, Ir. & Gael. salann, W.
   halen,  of  unknown  origin.  Cf.  Sal,  Salad, Salary, Saline, Sauce,
   Sausage.]

   1.  The  chloride  of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for
   the preservation of meat, etc. It is found native in the earth, and is
   also  produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea water and
   other water impregnated with saline particles.

   2. Hence, flavor; taste; savor; smack; seasoning.

     Though we are justices and doctors and churchmen . . . we have some
     salt of our youth in us. Shak.

   3. Hence, also, piquancy; wit; sense; as, Attic salt.

   4. A dish for salt at table; a saltcellar.

     I  out  and  bought  some  things;  among others, a dozen of silver
     salts. Pepys.

   5. A sailor; -- usually qualified by old. [Colloq.]

     Around  the  door are generally to be seen, laughing and gossiping,
     clusters of old salts. Hawthorne.

   6.  (Chem.)  The neutral compound formed by the union of an acid base;
   thus,  sulphuric acid and iron form the salt sulphate of iron or green
   vitriol.

     NOTE: &hand; Except in case of ammonium salts, accurately speaking,
     it is the acid radical which unites with the base or basic radical,
     with  the  elimination  of  hydrogen,  of  water,  or  of analogous
     compounds  as  side  products.  In  the  case of diacid and triacid
     bases, and of dibasic and tribasic acids, the mutual neutralization
     may  vary in degree, producing respectively basic, neutral, or acid
     salts See Phrases below.

   7.  Fig.:  That  which  preserves from corruption or error; that which
   purifies;   a   corrective;  an  antiseptic;  also,  an  allowance  or
   deduction; as, his statements must be taken with a grain of salt.

     Ye are the salt of the earth. Matt. v. 13.

   8.  pl.  Any mineral salt used as an aperient or cathartic, especially
   Epsom salts, Rochelle salt, or Glauber's salt.

   9. pl. Marches flooded by the tide. [Prov. Eng.]
   Above  the  salt,  Below the salt, phrases which have survived the old
   custom, in the houses of people of rank, of placing a large saltcellar
   near  the middle of a long table, the places above which were assigned
   to   the  guests  of  distinction,  and  those  below  to  dependents,
   inferiors, and poor relations. See Saltfoot.

     His  fashion is not to take knowledge of him that is beneath him in
     clothes. He never drinks below the salt. B. Jonson.

   -- Acid salt (Chem.) (a) A salt derived from an acid which has several
   replaceable  hydrogen  atoms  which  are  only partially exchanged for
   metallic  atoms  or  basic radicals; as, acid potassium sulphate is an
   acid  salt.  (b) A salt, whatever its constitution, which merely gives
   an acid reaction; thus, copper sulphate, which is composed of a strong
   acid  united  with  a weak base, is an acid salt in this sense, though
   theoretically  it  is a neutral salt. -- Alkaline salt (Chem.), a salt
   which  gives an alkaline reaction, as sodium carbonate. -- Amphid salt
   (Old  Chem.), a salt of the oxy type, formerly regarded as composed of
   two  oxides,  an  acid  and a basic oxide. [Obsolescent] -- Basic salt
   (Chem.)  (a)  A salt which contains more of the basic constituent than
   is  required  to  neutralize the acid. (b) An alkaline salt. -- Binary
   salt (Chem.), a salt of the oxy type conveniently regarded as composed
   of  two  ingredients (analogously to a haloid salt), viz., a metal and
   an  acid radical. -- Double salt (Chem.), a salt regarded as formed by
   the  union  of two distinct salts, as common alum, potassium aluminium
   sulphate.  See under Double. -- Epsom salts. See in the Vocabulary. --
   Essential  salt  (Old  Chem.),  a  salt obtained by crystalizing plant
   juices.  --  Ethereal  salt.  (Chem.) See under Ethereal. -- Glauber's
   salt  OR  salts.  See  in Vocabulary. -- Haloid salt (Chem.), a simple
   salt  of  a  halogen  acid,  as  sodium chloride. -- Microcosmic salt.
   (Chem.).  See under Microcosmic. -- Neutral salt. (Chem.) (a A salt in
   which  the acid and base (in theory) neutralize each other. (b) A salt
   which  gives  a  neutral reaction. -- Oxy salt (Chem.), a salt derived
   from  an  oxygen  acid. -- Per salt (Old Chem.), a salt supposed to be
   derived  from  a  peroxide  base  or  analogous  compound.  [Obs.]  --
   Permanent  salt,  a  salt which undergoes no change on exposure to the
   air.  --  Proto  salt (Chem.), a salt derived from a protoxide base or
   analogous  compound.  -- Rochelle salt. See under Rochelle. -- Salt of
   amber  (Old  Chem.),  succinic acid. -- Salt of colcothar (Old Chem.),
   green  vitriol, or sulphate of iron. -- Salt of hartshorn. (Old Chem.)
   (a)  Sal  ammoniac,  or ammonium chloride. (b) Ammonium carbonate. Cf.
   Spirit  of  hartshorn, under Hartshorn. -- Salt of lemons. (Chem.) See
   Salt  of  sorrel, below. -- Salt of Saturn (Old Chem.), sugar of lead;
   lead  acetate;  --  the  alchemical  of  lead being Saturn. -- Salt of
   Seignette.  Same as Rochelle salt. -- Salt of soda (Old Chem.), sodium
   carbonate.  --  Salt of sorrel (Old Chem.), acid potassium oxalate, or
   potassium quadroxalate, used as a solvent for ink stains; -- so called
   because  found  in  the sorrel, or Oxalis. Also sometimes inaccurately
   called  salt  of  lemon.  --  Salt  of  tartar  (Old Chem.), potassium
   carbonate;  --  so  called  because  formerly made by heating cream of
   tartar,  or  potassium  tartrate. [Obs.] -- Salt of Venus (Old Chem.),
   blue  vitriol; copper sulphate; -- the alchemical name of copper being
   Venus.  --  Salt  of wisdom. See Alembroth. -- Sedative salt (Old Med.
   Chem.),  boric  acid.  --  Sesqui  salt (Chem.), a salt derived from a
   sesquioxide base or analogous compound. -- Spirit of salt. (Chem.) See
   under Spirit. -- Sulpho salt (Chem.), a salt analogous to an oxy salt,
   but containing sulphur in place of oxygen.

                                     Salt

   Salt  (?), a. [Compar. Salter (?); superl. Saltest.] [AS. sealt, salt.
   See Salt, n.]

   1. Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared
   or  preserved  with,  or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt
   water. "Salt tears." Chaucer.

   2.  Overflowed with, or growing in, salt water; as, a salt marsh; salt
   grass.

   3. Fig.: Bitter; sharp; pungent.

     I have a salt and sorry rheum offends me. Shak.

   4. Fig.: Salacious; lecherous; lustful. Shak.
   Salt  acid (Chem.), hydrochloric acid. -- Salt block, an apparatus for
   evaporating  brine;  a  salt  factory.  Knight. -- Salt bottom, a flat
   piece  of  ground  covered  with  saline efforescences. [Western U.S.]
   bartlett.  --  Salt  cake (Chem.), the white caked mass, consisting of
   sodium  sulphate,  which is obtained as the product of the first stage
   in  the  manufacture  of soda, according to Leblanc's process. -- Salt
   fish.  (a)  Salted  fish,  especially cod, haddock, and similar fishes
   that  have  been salted and dried for food. (b) A marine fish. -- Salt
   garden,  an  arrangement  for the natural evaporation of sea water for
   the  production of salt, employing large shallow basins excavated near
   the  seashore.  -- Salt gauge, an instrument used to test the strength
   of  brine;  a  salimeter.  -- Salt horse, salted beef. [Slang] -- Salt
   junk,  hard  salt beef for use at sea. [Slang] -- Salt lick. See Lick,
   n. -- Salt marsh, grass land subject to the overflow of salt water. --
   Salt-marsh   caterpillar   (Zo\'94l.),   an   American  bombycid  moth
   (Spilosoma  acre\'91  which  is  very  destructive  to  the salt-marsh
   grasses  and to other crops. Called also wooly bear. See Illust. under
   Moth,  Pupa,  and  Woolly  bear,  under Woolly. -- Salt-marsh fleabane
   (Bot.),  a  strong-scented  composite  herb  (Pluchea camphorata) with
   rayless  purplish  heads,  growing  in salt marshes. -- Salt-marsh hen
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  clapper rail. See under Rail. -- Salt-marsh terrapin
   (Zo\'94l.),  the diamond-back. -- Salt mine, a mine where rock salt is
   obtained.  --  Salt  pan.  (a)  A  large  pan  used for making salt by
   evaporation;  also,  a shallow basin in the ground where salt water is
   evaporated  by the heat of the sun. (b) pl. Salt works. -- Salt pit, a
   pit where salt is obtained or made. -- Salt rising, a kind of yeast in
   which common salt is a principal ingredient. [U.S.] -- Salt raker, one
   who  collects  salt in natural salt ponds, or inclosures from the sea.
   --  Salt  sedative  (Chem.),  boracic  acid.  [Obs.] -- Salt spring, a
   spring  of  salt  water.  -- Salt tree (Bot.), a small leguminous tree
   (Halimodendron  argenteum)  growing  in the salt plains of the Caspian
   region  and in Siberia. -- Salt water, water impregnated with salt, as
   that  of  the  ocean  and  of  certain seas and lakes; sometimes, also
   tears.

     Mine  eyes  are  full  of  tears, I can not see; And yet salt water
     blinds  them  not so much But they can see a sort of traitors here.
     Shak.

   --   Salt-water  sailor,  an  ocean  mariner.  --  Salt-water  tailor.
   (Zo\'94l.) See Bluefish.

                                     Salt

   Salt, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salted; p. pr. & vb. n. Salting.]

   1. To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to preserve with salt
   or  in brine; to supply with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork; to
   salt cattle.

   2.  To  fill  with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for
   the preservation of the timber.
   To  salt  a  mine,  to artfully deposit minerals in a mine in order to
   deceive  purchasers  regarding  its  value. [Cant] -- To salt away, To
   salt  down, to prepare with, or pack in, salt for preserving, as meat,
   eggs, etc.; hence, colloquially, to save, lay up, or invest sagely, as
   money.

                                     Salt

   Salt  (?),  v.  i. To deposit salt as a saline solution; as, the brine
   begins to salt.

                                     Salt

   Salt  (?),  n.  [L. saltus, fr. salire to leap.] The act of leaping or
   jumping; a leap. [Obs.] B. Jonson.

                                    Saltant

   Sal"tant  (?),  a.  [L. saltans, p.pr. of saltare to dance, v. intens.
   fr. salire to leap: cf. F. sautant. See Sally, v.]

   1. Leaping; jumping; dancing.

   2.  (Her.)  In  a  leaping  position;  springing  forward;  -- applied
   especially  to  the  squirrel,  weasel,  and  rat,  also  to  the cat,
   greyhound, monkey, etc.

                                  Saltarella

   Sal`ta*rel"la (?), n. See Saltarello.

                                  Saltarello

   Sal`ta*rel"lo (?), n. [It., fr. L. saltare to jump.] A popular Italian
   dance in quick 3-4 or 6-8 time, running mostly in triplets, but with a
   hop step at the beginning of each measure. See Tarantella.

                                    Saltate

   Sal"tate (?), v. i. [See Saltant.] To leap or dance. [R.]

                                   Saltation

   Sal*ta"tion (?), n. [L. saltatio: cf. F. saltation.]

   1. A leaping or jumping.

     Continued his saltation without pause. Sir W. Scott.

   2. Beating or palpitation; as, the saltation of the great artery.

   3.  (Biol.)  An  abrupt  and  marked  variation  in  the  condition or
   appearance  of a species; a sudden modification which may give rise to
   new races.

     We  greatly suspect that nature does make considerable jumps in the
     way  of variation now and then, and that these saltations give rise
     to  some  of  the gaps which appear to exist in the series of known
     forms. Huxley.

                                  Saltatoria

   Sal`ta*to"ri*a  (?), n.; pl. [NL.] (Zo\'94l.) A division of Orthoptera
   including grasshoppers, locusts, and crickets.

                                  Saltatorial

   Sal`ta*to"ri*al (?), a.

   1. Relating to leaping; saltatory; as, saltatorial exercises.

   2.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a)  Same as Saltatorious. (b) Of or pertaining to the
   Saltatoria.

                                 Saltatorious

   Sal`ta*to"ri*ous  (?),  a.  Capable  of  leaping;  formed for leaping;
   saltatory; as, a saltatorious insect or leg.

                                   Saltatory

   Sal"ta*to"ry  (?),  a. [L. saltatorius. See Saltant, and cf. Saltire.]
   Leaping  or  dancing;  having  the  power  of,  or used in, leaping or
   dancing.  Saltatory  evolution  (Biol.),  a  theory of evolution which
   holds  that  the  transmutation  of species is not always gradual, but
   that  there  may  come sudden and marked variations. See Saltation.<--
   recently  revived  as  "punctuated equilibrium" --> -- Saltatory spasm
   (Med.),  an  affection in which pressure of the foot on a floor causes
   the patient to spring into the air, so as to make repeated involuntary
   motions of hopping and jumping. J. Ross.

                                   Saltbush

   Salt"bush` (?), n. (Bot.) An Australian plant (Atriplex nummularia) of
   the Goosefoot family.

                                    Saltcat

   Salt"cat`  (?),  n.  A  mixture  of  salt,  coarse  meal  lime,  etc.,
   attractive to pigeons.

                                  Saltcellar

   Salt"cel*lar  (?), n. [OE. saltsaler; salt + F. sali\'8are saltcellar,
   from  L. sal salt. See Salt, and cf. Salary.] Formerly a large vessel,
   now  a  small vessel of glass or other material, used for holding salt
   on the table.

                                    Salter

   Salt"er  (?),  n. One who makes, sells, or applies salt; one who salts
   meat or fish.

                                    Saltern

   Salt"ern  (?), n. A building or place where salt is made by boiling or
   by evaporation; salt works.

                                   Saltfoot

   Salt"foot`  (?), n. A large saltcellar formerly placed near the center
   of the table. The superior guests were seated above the saltfoot.

                                  Salt-green

   Salt"-green (?), a. Sea-green in color. Shak.

                                    Saltle

   Salt"le (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) The European dab.

                                    Saltier

   Sal"tier (?), n. See Saltire.

                                 Saltigrad\'91

   Sal`ti*gra"d\'91  (?), n. pl. [NL. See Saltigrade.] (Zo\'94l.) A tribe
   of spiders including those which lie in wait and leap upon their prey;
   the leaping spiders.

                                  Saltigrade

   Sal"ti*grade  (?),  a.  [L.  saltus a leap + gradi to walk, go: cf. F.
   saltigrade.] (Zo\'94l.) Having feet or legs formed for leaping.

                                  Saltigrade

   Sal"ti*grade,  n.  (Zo\'94l.)  One  of  the  Saltigrad\'91  a tribe of
   spiders which leap to seize their prey.

                                  Saltimbanco

   Sal`tim*ban"co (?), n. [It., literally, one who leaps or mounts upon a
   bench; saltare to leap + in in, upon + banco a bench.] A mountebank; a
   quack. [Obs.] [Written also santibanco.]

     Saltimbancos, quacksalvers, and charlatans. Sir T. browne.

                                    Salting

   Salt"ing (?), n.

   1. The act of sprinkling, impregnating, or furnishing, with salt.

   2. A salt marsh.

                                    Saltire

   Sal"tire  (?),  n. [F. sautoir, fr. LL. saltatorium a sort of stirrup,
   fr.  L.  saltatorius saltatory. See Saltatory, Sally, v.] (Her.) A St.
   Andrew's  cross, or cross in the form of an X, -- one of the honorable
   ordinaries.

                                  Saltirewise

   Sal"tire*wise`  (?),  adv.  (Her.) In the manner of a saltire; -- said
   especially  of the blazoning of a shield divided by two lines drawn in
   the  direction  of  a  bend  and  a bend sinister, and crossing at the
   center.

                                    Saltish

   Salt"ish (?), a. Somewhat salt. -- Salt"ish*ly, adv. -- Salt"ish*ness,
   n.

                                   Saltless

   Salt"less, a. Destitute of salt; insipid.

                                    Saltly

   Salt"ly, adv. With taste of salt; in a salt manner.

                                   Saltmouth

   Salt"mouth`  (?),  n.  A  wide-mouthed  bottle  with glass stopper for
   holding chemicals, especially crystallized salts.
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                                   Saltness

   Salt"ness  (?),  n.  The  quality  or state of being salt, or state of
   being  salt, or impregnated with salt; salt taste; as, the saltness of
   sea water.

                             Saltpeter, Saltpetre

   Salt`pe"ter,  Salt`pe"tre,  (,  n.  [F.  salp\'88tre,  NL. sal petrae,
   literally,  rock  salt,  or  stone  salt;  Salt, and Petrify.] (Chem.)
   Potassium  nitrate; niter, a white crystalline substance, KNO3, having
   a  cooling  saline  taste,  obtained by leaching from certain soils in
   which   it   is   produced   by  the  process  of  nitrification  (see
   Nitrification,  2).  It is a strong oxidizer, is the chief constituent
   of gunpowder, and is also used as an antiseptic in curing meat, and in
   medicine  as  a diuretic, diaphoretic, and refrigerant. Chili salpeter
   (Chem.), sodium nitrate (distinguished from potassium nitrate, or true
   salpeter),  a  white  crystalline  substance, NaNO3, having a cooling,
   saline,  slightly bitter taste. It is obtained by leaching the soil of
   the  rainless  districts  of  Chili  and  Peru. It is deliquescent and
   cannot  be  used  in  gunpowder,  but is employed in the production of
   nitric  acid.  Called  also  cubic  niter.  -- Saltpeter acid (Chem.),
   nitric acid; -- sometimes so called because made from saltpeter.

                                  Saltpetrous

   Salt`pe"trous (?), a. [Cf. F. salp\'88treux.] Pertaining to saltpeter,
   or partaking of its qualities; impregnated with saltpeter. [Obs.]

                                  Salt rheum

   Salt" rheum (?). (Med.) A popular name, esp. in the United States, for
   various  cutaneous  eruptions,  particularly  for those of eczema. See
   Eczema.

                                   Saltwort

   Salt`wort` (?), n. (Bot.) A name given to several plants which grow on
   the seashore, as the Batis maritima, and the glasswort. See Glasswort.
   Black saltwort, the sea milkwort.

                                     Salty

   Salt"y (?), a. Somewhat salt; saltish.

                                  Salubrious

   Sa*lu"bri*ous (?), a. [L. salubris, or saluber, fr. salus health; akin
   to   salvus  safe,  sound,  well.  See  Safe.]  Favorable  to  health;
   healthful;  promoting  health;  as, salubrious air, water, or climate.
   Syn.  -- Healthful; wholesome; healthy; salutary. -- Sa-lu"bri*ous*ly,
   adv. -- Sa*lu"bri*ous*ness, n.

                                   Salubrity

   Sa*lu"bri*ty   (?),   n.  [L.  salubritas:  cf.  F.  salubrit\'82  See
   Salubrious.]  The  quality  of  being salubrious; favorableness to the
   preservation  of health; salubriousness; wholesomeness; healthfulness;
   as,  the  salubrity  of the air, of a country, or a climate. "A sweet,
   dry small of salubrity." G. W. Cable.

                                     Salue

   Sa*lue" (?), v. t. [F. saluer. See Salute.] To salute. [Obs.]

     There was no "good day" and no saluyng. Chaucer.

                                   Salutary

   Sal"u*ta*ry  (?),  a. [L. salutaris, from salus, -utis, health safety:
   cf. F. salutaire. See Salubrious.]

   1. Wholesome; healthful; promoting health; as, salutary exercise.

   2.   Promotive  of,  or  contributing  to,  some  beneficial  purpose;
   beneficial;  advantageous;  as,  a salutary design. Syn. -- Wholesome;
   healthful;  salubrious;  beneficial; useful; advantageous; profitable.
   -- Sal"u*ta*ri*ly (#), adv. -- Sal"u*ta*ri*ness, n.

                                  Salutation

   Sal`u*ta"tion  (?),  n. [L. salutatio: cf. F. salutation. See Salute.]
   The  act of saluting, or paying respect or reverence, by the customary
   words  or  actions;  the  act  of greeting, or expressing good will or
   courtesy; also, that which is uttered or done in saluting or greeting.

     In  all  public  meetings  or private addresses, use those forms of
     salutation,  reverence,  and  decency  usual amongst the most sober
     persons. Jer. Taylor.

   Syn.  --  Greeting;  salute; address. -- Salutation, Greeting, Salute,
   Greeting  is  the  general  word  for  all  manner  of  expressions of
   recognition,  agreeable  or  otherwise,  made  when  persons  meet  or
   communicate  with  each  other.  A  greeting may be hearty and loving,
   chilling  and  offensive, or merely formal, as in the opening sentence
   of legal documents. Salutation more definitely implies a wishing well,
   and  is  used  of  expressions at parting as well as at meeting. It is
   used  especially  of  uttered  expressions of good will. Salute, while
   formerly  and  sometimes  still  in  the  sense  of either greeting or
   salutation,   is  now  used  specifically  to  denote  a  conventional
   demonstration  not  expressed in words. The guests received a greeting
   which   relieved  their  embrassment,  offered  their  salutations  in
   well-chosen terms, and when they retired, as when they entered, made a
   deferential salute.

     Woe  unto  you,  Pharisees!  for ye love the uppermost seats in the
     synagogues, and greetings in the markets. Luke xi. 43.

     When Elisabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the babe leaped in her
     womb. Luke i. 41.

     I  shall  not trouble my reader with the first salutes of our three
     friends. Addison.

                                 Salutatorian

   Sa*lu`ta*to"ri*an  (?),  n.  The student who pronounces the salutatory
   oration  at the annual Commencement or like exercises of a college, --
   an  honor commonly assigned to that member of the graduating class who
   ranks second in scholarship. [U.S.]

                                 Salutatorily

   Sa*lu"ta*to*ri*ly (?), adv. By way of salutation.

                                  Salutatory

   Sa*lu"ta*to*ry  (?),  a.  [L. salutatorius. See Salute.] Containing or
   expressing  salutations;  speaking  a  welcome;  greeting;  -- applied
   especially  to  the  oration  which  introduces  the  exercises of the
   Commencements, or similar public exhibitions, in American colleges.

                                  Salutatory

   Sa*lu"ta*to*ry, n.

   1.  A  place  for  saluting  or greeting; a vestibule; a porch. [Obs.]
   Milton.

   2. (American Colleges) The salutatory oration.

                                    Salute

   Sa*lute"  (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Saluted; p. pr. & vb. n. Saluting.]
   [L.  salutare,  salutatum,  from  salus,  -utis,  health,  safety. See
   Salubrious.]

   1.  To  adress,  as  with  expressions of kind wishes and courtesy; to
   greet; to hail.

     I salute you with this kingly title. Shak.

   2.  Hence,  to  give  a  sign of good will; to compliment by an act or
   ceremony, as a kiss, a bow, etc.

     You  have  the  prettiest  tip  of  a  finger . . . I must take the
     freedom to salute it. Addison.

   3.  (Mil.  &  Naval)  To  honor,  as some day, person, or nation, by a
   discharge of cannon or small arms, by dipping colors, by cheers, etc.

   4.  To  promote  the  welfare  and  safety of; to benefit; to gratify.
   [Obs.] "If this salute my blood a jot." Shak.

                                    Salute

   Sa*lute" (?), n. [Cf. F. salut. See Salute, v.]

   1.  The  act  of  saluting,  or  expressing  kind  wishes  or respect;
   salutation; greeting.

   2.  A  sign,  token, or ceremony, expressing good will, compliment, or
   respect, as a kiss, a bow, etc. Tennyson.

   3.  (Mil.  & Naval) A token of respect or honor for some distinguished
   or  official  personage,  for  a  foreign  vessel or flag, or for some
   festival  or  event,  as by presenting arms, by a discharge of cannon,
   volleys of small arms, dipping the colors or the topsails, etc.

                                    Saluter

   Sa*lut"er (?), n. One who salutes.

                                 Salutiferous

   Sal`u*tif"er*ous  (?),  a. [L. salutifer; salus, -utis, health + ferre
   to   bring.]  Bringing  health;  healthy;  salutary;  beneficial;  as,
   salutiferous air. [R.]

     Innumerable powers, all of them salutiferous. Cudworth.

   Syn. -- Healthful; healthy; salutary; salubrious.

                                Salutiferously

   Sal`u*tif"er*ous*ly, adv. Salutarily. [R.]

                                  Salvability

   Sal`va*bil"i*ty  (?),  n.  The quality or condition of being salvable;
   salvableness. [R.]

     In  the  Latin  scheme  of redemption, salvability was not possible
     outside the communion of the visible organization. A. V. G. Allen.

                                   Salvable

   Sal"va*ble  (?),  a.  [L.  salvare  to  save,  from  salvus  safe. Cf.
   Savable.] Capable of being saved; admitting of salvation. Dr. H. More.
   -- Sal"va*ble*ness, n. -- Sal"va*bly, adv.

                                    Salvage

   Sal"vage  (?;  48), n. [F. salvage, OF. salver to save, F. sauver, fr.
   L. salvare. See Save.]

   1.  The  act  of saving a vessel, goods, or life, goods, or life, from
   perils of the sea.

     Salvage  of  life from a british ship, or a foreign ship in British
     waters, ranks before salvage of goods. Encyc. Brit.

   2.  (Maritime  Law)  (a)  The  compensation  allowed  to  persons  who
   voluntarily  assist in saving a ship or her cargo from peril. (b) That
   part  of  the  property  that  survives  the peril and is saved. Kent.
   Abbot.

                                    Salvage

   Sal"vage, a. & n. Savage. [Obs.] Spenser.

                                   Salvation

   Sal*va"tion  (?),  n. [OE. salvacioun, sauvacion, F. salvation, fr. L.
   salvatio, fr. salvare to save. See Save.]

   1.  The  act  of saving; preservation or deliverance from destruction,
   danger, or great calamity.

   2.  (Theol.)  The  redemption  of  man  from  the  bondage  of sin and
   liability  to  eternal death, and the conferring on him of everlasting
   happiness.

     To earn salvation for the sons of men. Milton.

     Godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation. 2. Cor. vii. 10.

   3. Saving power; that which saves.

     Fear  ye not; stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord, which
     he will show to you to-day. Ex. xiv. 13.

   Salvation  Army, an organization for prosecuting the work of Christian
   evangelization,  especially  among the degraded populations of cities.
   It is virtually a new sect founded in London in 1861 by William Booth.
   The  evangelists,  male  and female, have military titles according to
   rank,  that  of the chief being "General." They wear a uniform, and in
   their phraseology and mode of work adopt a quasi military style.

                                 Salvationist

   Sal*va"tion*ist,  n.  An  evangelist,  a  member, or a recruit, of the
   Salvation Army.

                                   Salvatory

   Sal"va*to*ry  (?),  n. [LL. salvatorium, fr. salvare to save.] A place
   where things are preserved; a repository. [R.] Sir M. Hale.

                                     Salve

   Sal"ve (?), interj. [L., hail, God save you, imperat. of salvere to be
   well. Cf. Salvo a volley.] Hail!

                                     Salve

   Sal"ve (? OR ?), v. t. To say "Salve" to; to greet; to salute. [Obs.]

     By  this  that  stranger knight in presence came, And goodly salved
     them. Spenser.

                                     Salve

   Salve  (?;  277), n. [AS. sealf ointment; akin to LG. salwe, D. zalve,
   zalf,  OHG.  salba,  Dan.  salve, Sw. salva, Goth. salb to anoint, and
   probably to Gr. (Hesychius) sapris clarified butter. &root;155, 291.]

   1.  An  adhesive  composition  or substance to be applied to wounds or
   sores; a healing ointment. Chaucer.

   2. A soothing remedy or antidote.

     Counsel or consolation we may bring. Salve to thy sores. Milton.

   Salve bug (Zo\'94l.), a large, stout isopod crustacean (\'92ga psora),
   parasitic  on  the  halibut  and  codfish, -- used by fishermen in the
   preparation of a salve. It becomes about two inches in length.

                                     Salve

   Salve,  v. t. [imp. & p. p. Salved (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Salving.] [AS.
   sealfian to anoint. See Salve, n.]

   1.  To  heal  by  applications  or  medicaments;  to  cure by remedial
   traetment; to apply salve to; as, to salve a wound. Shak.

   2.  To  heal;  to remedy; to cure; to make good; to soothe, as with an
   ointment, especially by some device, trick, or quibble; to gloss over.

     But Ebranck salved both their infamies With noble deeds. Spenser.

     What may we do, then, to salve this seeming inconsistence? Milton.

   <-- salve one's conscience. salve one's wounded pride -->

                                     Salve

   Salve  (?), v. t. & i. [See Salvage] To save, as a ship or goods, from
   the perils of the sea. [Recent]

                                    Salver

   Salv"er  (?),  n.  One who salves, or uses salve as a remedy; hence, a
   quacksalver, or quack. [Obs.]

                                    Salver

   Sal"ver (?), n. [Cf. Salvage.] A salvor. Skeat.

                                    Salver

   Sal"ver  (?), n. [Sp. salva pregustation, the tasting of viands before
   they  are  served,  salver, fr. salvar to save, to taste, to prove the
   food or drink of nobles, from L. salvare to save. See Save.] A tray or
   waiter  on  which  anything  is  presented.  <--  now  used  mostly in
   compounds; e.g. tea salver -->

                                 Salver-shaped

   Sal"ver-shaped`  (?),  a.  (Bot.) Tubular, with a speading border. See
   Hypocraterimorphous.

                                    Salvia

   Sal"vi*a  (?),  n.  [L., sage.] (Bot.) A genus of plants including the
   sage. See Sage.

                                   Salvific

   Sal*vif"ic (?), a. [L. salficus saving; salvus saved, safe + facere to
   make.] Tending to save or secure safety. [Obs.]

                                     Salvo

   Sal"vo  (?),  n.; pl. Salvos (#). [L. salvo jure, literally, the right
   being reserved. See Safe.] An exception; a reservation; an excuse.

     They admit many salvos, cautions, and reservations. Eilon Basilike.

                                     Salvo

   Sal"vo,  n.  [F. salve a discharge of heavy cannon, a volley, L. salve
   hail, imperat. of salvere to be well, akin to salvus well. See Safe.]

   1.  (Mil.)  A  concentrated  fire  from  pieces  of  artillery,  as in
   endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.

   2.  A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of
   a number of cannon.

                                    Salvor

   Sal"vor  (?), n. [See Salvation, Save] (Law) One who assists in saving
   a  ship  or goods at sea, without being under special obligation to do
   so. Wheaton.

                                      Sam

   Sam  (?),  adv. [AS. same. See Same, a.] Together. [Obs.] "All in that
   city sam." Spenser.

                                    Samara

   Sa*ma"ra (? OR ?), n. [L. samara, samera, the seed of the elm.] (Bot.)
   A  dry,  indehiscent, usually one-seeded, winged fruit, as that of the
   ash, maple, and elm; a key or key fruit.

                                    Samare

   Sam"are (?), n. See Simar.

                                   Samaritan

   Sa*mar"i*tan (?), a. [L. Samaritanus.] Of or pertaining to Samaria, in
   Palestine. -- n. A native or inhabitant of Samaria; also, the language
   of Samaria.

                                   Samarium

   Sa*ma"ri*um  (?), n. [NL., fr. E. samarskite.] (Chem.) A rare metallic
   element of doubtful identity.

     NOTE: &hand; Sa  marium wa  s di scovered, by  me ans of  sp ectrum
     analysis,  in certain minerals (samarskite, cerite, etc.), in which
     it  is  associated  with other elements of the earthy group. It has
     been  confounded  with  the donbtful elements decipium, philippium,
     etc.,  and  is  possibly  a  complex mixture of elements not as yet
     clearly identified. Symbol Sm. Provisional atomic weight 150.2.

   <--  a  true  element.  Symb.  Sa  or  Sm; At. No. 62; At. wt. 150.43.
   Valence 2 or 3. -->

                                   Samaroid

   Sam"a*roid  (?;  277), a. [Samara + -oid.] (Bot.) Resembling a samara,
   or winged seed vessel.

                                    Samarra

   Sa*mar"ra (?), n. See Simar.

                                  Samarskite

   Sa*mar"skite  (?),  a.  [After  Samarski,  a  Russian.]  (Min.) A rare
   mineral  having  a  velvet-black color and submetallic luster. It is a
   niobate of uranium, iron, and the yttrium and cerium metals.

                                     Sambo

   Sam"bo, n. [Sp. zambo, sambo.] A colloquial or humorous appelation for
   a  negro;  sometimes, the offspring of a black person and a mulatto; a
   zambo.<-- deprecatory and impolite -->

                                    Samboo

   Sam"boo (?), n. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sumbur.

                                   Sambucus

   Sam*bu"cus  (?),  n. [L., an elder tree.] (Bot.) A genus of shrubs and
   trees; the elder.

                                    Sambuke

   Sam"buke   (?),  n.  [L.  sambuca,  Gr.  (Mus.)  An  ancient  stringed
   instrument used by the Greeks, the particular construction of which is
   unknown.

                                    Sambur

   Sam"bur (?), n. [Hind. s\'bembar, s\'bebar.] (Zo\'94l.) An East Indian
   deer  (Rusa  Aristotelis)  having a mane on its neck. Its antlers have
   but  three  prongs.  Called  also  gerow. The name is applied to other
   species of the genus Rusa, as the Bornean sambur (R. equina).

                                     Same

   Same  (?), a. [AS. same. adv.; akin to OS. sama, samo, adv., OHG. sam,
   a.,  sama,  adv.,  Icel. samr, a., Sw. samme, samma, Dan. samme, Goth.
   sama, Russ. samui, Gr. sama, Gr. simul at the same time, similis like,
   and   E.   some,   a.,  -some.  &root;191.  Cf.  Anomalous,  Assemble,
   Homeopathy, Homily, Seem, v. i., Semi-, Similar, Some.]

   1.   Not  different  or  other;  not  another  or  others;  identical;
   unchanged.

     Thou art the same, and thy years shall have no end. Ps. cii. 27.

   2. Of like kind, species, sort, dimensions, or the like; not differing
   in  character  or in the quality or qualities compared; corresponding;
   not discordant; similar; like.

     The ethereal vigor is in all the same. Dryden.

   3. Just mentioned, or just about to be mentioned.

     What ye know, the same do I know. Job. xiii. 2.

     Do  but think how well the same he spends, Who spends his blood his
     country to relieve. Daniel.

     NOTE: &hand; Same is commonly preceded by the, this, or that and is
     often   used   substantively  as  in  the  citations  above.  In  a
     comparative use it is followed by as or with.

     Bees like the same odors as we do. Lubbock.

     [He]  held the same political opinions with his illustrious friend.
     Macaulay.

                                  Sameliness

   Same"li*ness (?), n. Sameness, 2. [R.] Bayne.

                                   Sameness

   Same"ness, n.

   1. The state of being the same, identity; abscence of difference; near
   resemblance;  correspondence; similarity; as, a sameness of person, of
   manner,  of  sound,  of  appearance,  and the like. "A sameness of the
   terms." Bp. Horsley.

   2.  Hence,  want  of  variety;  tedious  monotony.  Syn.  -- Identity;
   identicalness; oneness.

                                    Samette

   Sa*mette" (?), n. See Samite. [Obs.]

                                    Samian

   Sa"mi*an (?), a. [L. Samius.] Of or pertaining to the island of Samos.

     Fill high the cup with Samian wine. Byreon.

   Samian  earth, a species of clay from Samoa, formerly used in medicine
   as an astringent.

                                    Samian

   Sa"mi*an, n. A native or inhabitant of Samos.

                                    Samiel

   Sa"mi*el  (?;  277),  n.  [Turk. sam-yeli; Ar. samm poison + Turk. yel
   wind. Cf. Simoom.] A hot and destructive wind that sometimes blows, in
   Turkey, from the desert. It is identical with the simoom of Arabia and
   the kamsin of Syria.

                                    Samiot

   Sa"mi*ot (?), a. & n. [Cf. F. samiote.] Samian.
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   Page 1273

                                    Samite

   Sa"mite  (?), a. [OF. samit, LL. samitum, examitum, from LGr. Six, and
   cf. Dimity.] A species of silk stuff, or taffeta, generally interwoven
   with gold. Tennyson.

     In silken samite she was light arrayed. Spenser.

                                    Samlet

   Sam"let (?), n. [Cf. Salmonet.] The parr.

                                    Sammier

   Sam"mi*er  (?),  n.  A  machine  for  pressing the water from skins in
   tanning. Knight.

                                    Samoan

   Sa*mo"an  (?),  a.  Of  or  pertaining to the Samoan Islands (formerly
   called  Navigators'  Islands)  in  the  South  Pacific Ocean, or their
   inhabitants. -- n. An inhabitant of the Samoan Islands.

                                    Samovar

   Sa"mo*var  (?),  n.  [Russ.  samovar'.] A metal urn used in Russia for
   making  tea.  It  is  filled  with  water, which is heated by charcoal
   placed in a pipe, with chimney attached, which passes through the urn.
   <--  Samoyed.  1.  A  breed  of medium-sized sled dogs, originating in
   Siberia,  of  white or cream color. 2. A Uralic language spoken by the
   Samoyed people. -->

                                   Samoyedes

   Sam`oy*edes"  (?), n. pl.; sing. Samoyede (. (Ethnol.) An ignorant and
   degraded  Turanian  tribe  which occupies a portion of Northern Russia
   and a part of Siberia.<-- also Samoyeds. -->

                                     Samp

   Samp  (?),  n.  [From  American Indian s\'bepac, saupac, made soft, or
   thinned.]  An  article  of food consisting of maize broken or bruised,
   which  is  cooked  by  by boiling, and usually eaten with milk; coarse
   hominy.

                                    Sampan

   Sam"pan  (?),  n.  (Naut.)  A Chinese boat from twelve to fifteen feet
   long,  covered  with  a  house,  and  sometimes  used  as  a permanent
   habitation on the inland waters. [Written also sanpan.]

                                   Samphire

   Sam"phire  (?  OR  ?; 277), n. [F. l'herbe de Saint Pierre. See Saint,
   and   Petrel.]  (Bot.)  (a)  A  fleshy,  suffrutescent,  umbelliferous
   European  plant  (Crithmum  maritimum).  It  grows  among rocks and on
   cliffs along the seacoast, and is used for pickles.

     Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade! Scak.

   (b)  The  species  of  glasswort  (Salicornia  herbacea); -- called in
   England  marsh  samphire. (c) A seashore shrub (Borrichia arborescens)
   of the West Indies. Golden samphire. See under Golden.

                                    Sample

   Sam"ple  (?),  n. [OE. sample, asaumple, OF. essample, example, fr. L.
   exemplum. See Example, and cf. Ensample, Sampler.]

   1. Example; pattern. [Obs.] Spenser. "A sample to the youngest." Shak.

     Thus  he  concludes,  and  every  hardy knight His sample followed.
     Fairfax.

   2.  A  part of anything presented for inspection, or shown as evidence
   of the quality of the whole; a specimen; as, goods are often purchased
   by samples.

     I  design  this  but  for  a  sample  of  what I hope more fully to
     discuss. Woodward.

   Syn. -- Specimen; example. See Specimen.

                                    Sample

   Sam"ple, v. t.

   1. To make or show something similar to; to match. Bp. Hall.

   2.  To  take  or  to test a sample or samples of; as, to sample sugar,
   teas, wools, cloth.

                                    Sampler

   Sam"pler (?), n. [See Exampler, Exemplar.]

   1.  One who makes up samples for inspection; one who examines samples,
   or by samples; as, a wool sampler.

   2.  A  pattern;  a  specimen;  especially,  a collection of needlework
   patterns,  as  letters,  borders,  etc.,  to be used as samples, or to
   display the skill of the worker.

     Susie  dear, bring your sampler and Mrs. Schumann will show you how
     to make that W you bothered over. E. E. Hale.

                                Samshoo, Samshu

   Sam"shoo,  Sam"shu (, n. [Chinese san-shao thrice fired.] A spirituous
   liquor distilled by the Chinese from the yeasty liquor in which boiled
   rice has fermented under pressure. S. W. Williams.

                                    Samson

   Sam"son  (?),  n.  An  Israelite  of  Bible record (see Judges xiii.),
   distinguished  for  his  great strength; hence, a man of extraordinary
   physical  strength.  Samson post. (a) (Naut.) A strong post resting on
   the  keelson,  and  supporting a beam of the keelson, and supporting a
   beam  of  the  deck;  also,  a  temporary  or movable pilar carrying a
   leading  block  or  pulley  for  various  purposes. Brande & C. (b) In
   deepwell  boring,  the  post  which  supports  the walking beam of the
   apparatus.

                                  Sanability

   San`a*bil"i*ty  (?),  n.  The  quality  or  state  of  being  sanable;
   sanableness; curableness.

                                    Sanable

   San"a*ble  (?), a. [L. sanabilis, fr. sanare to heal, fr. sanus sound,
   healthy.  See  Sane.] Capable of being healed or cured; susceptible of
   remedy. Syn. -- Remediable; curable; healable.

                                  Sanableness

   San"a*ble*ness, n. The quality of being sanable.

                                   Sanation

   Sa*na"tion  (?),  n.  [L. sanatio. See Sanable.] The act of healing or
   curing. [Obs.] Wiseman.

                                   Sanative

   San"a*tive  (?), a. [LL. sanativus.] Having the power to cure or heal;
   healing; tending to heal; sanatory. -- San"a*tive*ness, n.

                                  Sanatorium

   San`a*to"ri*um  (?),  n.  [NL. See Sanatory.] An establishment for the
   treatment of the sick; a resort for invalids. See Sanitarium.

                                   Sanatory

   San"a*to*ry  (?), a. [LL. sanatorius, fr. L. sa to heal. See Sanable.]
   Conducive to health; tending to cure; healing; curative; sanative.

     Sanatory  ordinances  for  the protection of public health, such as
     quarantine, fever hospitals, draining, etc. De Quincey.

     NOTE: &hand; Sa natory an d sa nitary sh ould no t be  co nfounded.
     Sanatory signifies conducive to health, while sanitary has the more
     general meaning of pertaining to health.

                                   Sanbenito

   San`be*ni"to  (?), n. [Sp. & Pg. sambenito, contr. from L. saccus sack
   + benedictus blessed.]

   1. Anciently, a sackcloth coat worn by penitens on being reconciled to
   the church.

   2. A garnment or cap, or sometimes both, painted with flames, figures,
   etc., and worn by persons who had been examined by the Inquisition and
   were brought forth for punishment at the auto-da-f\'82.

                           Sance-bell, Sanctte bell

   Sance"-bell"  (?),  Sanct"te  bell"  (?),  n.  See Sanctus bell, under
   Sanctus.

                                 Sanctificate

   Sanc"ti*fi*cate  (?),  v. t. [L. sanctificatus, p.p. of sanctificare.]
   To sanctify. [Obs.] Barrow.

                                Sanctification

   Sanc`ti*fi*ca"tion (?), n. [L. sanctificatio: cf. F. sanctification.]

   1. The act of sanctifying or making holy; the being sanctified or made
   holy; esp. (Theol.), the act of God's grace by which the affections of
   men are purified, or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to,
   a  supreme  love  to  God;  also,  the state of being thus purified or
   sanctified.

     God  hath  from  the  baginning  chosen  you  to  salvation through
     sanctification  of the Spirit and belief of the truth. 2 Thess. ii.
     13.

   2. The act of consecrating, or of setting apart, for a sacred purpose;
   consecration. Bp. Burnet.

                                  Sanctified

   Sanc"ti*fied  (?),  a.  Made  holy;  also,  made  to  have  the air of
   sanctity; sanctimonious.

                                  Sanctifier

   Sanc"ti*fi`er (?), n. One who sanctifies, or makes holy; specifically,
   the Holy Spirit.

                                   Sanctify

   Sanc"ti*fy  (?),  v.  t. [imp. & p. p. Sanctified (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Sanctifying  (?).]  [F.  sanctifier,  L.  sanctificare; sanctus holy +
   -ficare (in comp.) to make. See Saint, and -fy.]

   1. To make sacred or holy; to set apart to a holy or religious use; to
   consecrate by appropriate rites; to hallow.

     God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it. Gen. ii. 3.

     Moses . . . sanctified Aaron and his garnment. Lev. viii. 30.

   2.  To  make  free  from  sin;  to  cleanse  from moral corruption and
   pollution; to purify.

     Sanctify them through thy truth. John xvii. 17.

   3. To make efficient as the means of holiness; to render productive of
   holiness or piety.

     A  means  which  his  mercy  hath sanctified so to me as to make me
     repent of that unjust act. Eikon Basilike.

   4. To impart or impute sacredness, venerableness, inviolability, title
   to  reverence  and respect, or the like, to; to secure from violation;
   to give sanction to.

     The  holy  man,  amazed  at what he saw, Made haste to sanctify the
     bliss by law. Dryden.

     Truth guards the poet, sanctifies the line. Pope.

                                 Sanctifyingly

   Sanc"ti*fy`ing*ly  (?), adv. In a manner or degree tending to sanctify
   or make holy.

                                 Sanctiloquent

   Sanc*til"o*quent  (?),  a. [L. sanctus holy + loquens, p. pr. of loqui
   to  speak.]  Discoursing  on  heavenly  or  holy  things, or in a holy
   manner.

                                 Sanctimonial

   Sanc`ti*mo"ni*al  (?),  a.  [Cf.  LL.  sanctimonialis. ] Sanctimonius.
   [Obs.]

                                 Sanctimonious

   Sanc`ti*mo"ni*ous (?), a. [See Sanctimony.]

   1. Possessing sanctimony; holy; sacred; saintly. Shak.

   2.  Making  a  show of sanctity; affecting saintliness; hypocritically
   devout   or   pious.   "Like   the  sanctimonious  pirate."  Shak.  --
   Sanc`ti*mo"ni*ous*ly, adv. -- Sanc`ti*mo"ni*ous*ness, n.

                                  Sanctimony

   Sanc"ti*mo*ny  (?),  n.  [L.  sanctimonia,  fr.  sanctus holy: cf. OF.
   sanctimonie.  See  Saint.] Holiness; devoutness; scrupulous austerity;
   sanctity;  especially,  outward  or artificial saintliness; assumed or
   pretended holiness; hypocritical devoutness.

     Her  pretense  is  a  pilgrimage; . . . which holy undertaking with
     most austere sanctimony she accomplished. Shak.

                                   Sanction

   Sanc"tion  (?), n. [L. sanctio, from sancire, samctum to render sacred
   or inviolable, to fix unalternably: cf. F. sanction. See Saint.]

   1.  Solemn  or ceremonious ratification; an official act of a superior
   by  which  he  ratifies  and  gives  validity to the act of some other
   person  or body; establishment or furtherance of anything by authority
   to it; confirmation; approbation.

     The strictest professors of reason have added the sanction of their
     testimony. I. Watts.

   2.  Anything  done  or  said to enforce the will, law, or authority of
   another;  as,  legal  sanctions.  Syn. -- Ratification; authorization;
   authoruty; countenance; support.

                                   Sanction

   Sanc"tion,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  Sanctioned  (?); p. pr. & vb. n.
   Sanctioning.] To give sanction to; to ratify; to confirm; to approve.

     Would   have   counseled,   or   even   sanctioned,  such  perilous
     experiments. De Quincey.

   Syn. -- To ratify; confirm; authorize; countenance.

                                  Sanctionary

   Sanc"tion*a*ry (?), a. Of, pertaining to, or giving, sanction.

                                  Sanctitude

   Sanc"ti*tude  (?), a. [L. sanctitudo.] Holiness; sacredness; sanctity.
   [R.] milton.

                                   Sanctity

   Sanc"ti*ty  (?),  n.;  pl. Sanctities (#). [L. sanctitas, from sanctus
   holy. See Saint.]

   1.   The   state  or  quality  of  being  sacred  or  holy;  holiness;
   saintliness; moral purity; godliness.

     To sanctity she made no pretense, and, indeed, narrowly escaped the
     imputation of irreligion. Macaulay.

   2.  Sacredness; solemnity; inviolability; religious binding force; as,
   the sanctity of an oath.

   3. A saint or holy being. [R.]

     About him all the sanctities of heaven. Milton.

   Syn.  --  Holiness;  godliness;  piety;  devotion;  goodness;  purity;
   religiousness;sacredness; solemnity. See the Note under Religion.

                                  Sanctuarize

   Sanc"tu*a*rize (?), v. t. To shelter by means of a sanctuary or sacred
   privileges. [Obs.] Shak.

                                   Sanctuary

   Sanc"tu*a*ry  (?),  n.;  pl.  Sanctuaries  (#).  [OE.  seintuare,  OF.
   saintuaire,  F.  sanctuaire,  fr. L. sanctuarium, from sanctus sacred,
   holy.  See  Saint.]  A  sacred  place;  a consecrated spot; a holy and
   inviolable site. Hence, specifically: (a) The most retired part of the
   temple  at Jerusalem, called the Holy of Holies, in which was kept the
   ark  of  the covenant, and into which no person was permitted to enter
   except  the high priest, and he only once a year, to intercede for the
   people; also, the most sacred part of the tabernacle; also, the temple
   at  Jerusalem.  (b)  (Arch.)  The  most  sacred  part of any religious
   building,  esp.  that part of a Christian church in which the altar is
   placed.  (c)  A house consecrated to the worship of God; a place where
   divine  service  is  performed;  a  church,  temple, or other place of
   worship.  (d)  A  sacred  and inviolable asylum; a place of refuge and
   protection; shelter; refuge; protection.

     These laws, whoever made them, bestowed on temples the privelege of
     sanctuary. Milton

   .

     These  admirable works of painting were made fuel for the fire; but
     some  relics  of  it  took  sanctuary under ground, and escaped the
     common destiny. Dryden.

   <--  Wildlife  sanctuary,  a  tract  of  land set aside by law for the
   preservation of wildlife, in which no hunting is permitted. -->

                                    Sanctum

   Sanc"tum (?), n. [L., p.p. of sanctire to consecrate.] A sacred place;
   hence,  a  place  of retreat; a room reserved for personal use; as, an
   editor's  sanctum.  Sanctum  sanctorum  [L.] , the Holy of Holies; the
   most holy place, as in the Jewish temple.

                                    Sanctus

   Sanc"tus (?), n. [L. sanctus, p.p. of sancire.]

   1.  (Eccl.)  A part of the Mass, or, in Protestant churches, a part of
   the  communion service, of which the first words in Latin are Sanctus,
   sanctus, sanctus [Holy, holy, holy]; -- called also Tersanctus.

   2. (Mus.) An anthem composed for these words.
   Sanctus bell, a small bell usually suspended in a bell cot at the apex
   of  the nave roof, over the chancel arch, in medi\'91val churches, but
   a  hand  bell  is  now  often  used;  -- so called because rung at the
   singing of the sanctus, at the conclusion of the ordinary of the Mass,
   and again at the elevation of the host. Called also Mass bell, sacring
   bell, saints' bell, sance-bell, sancte bell.
   
                                     Sand
                                       
   Sand  (?),  n.  [AS.  sand; akin to D. zand, G. sand, OHG. sant, Icel.
   sandr, Dan. & Sw. sand, Gr. 

   1.  Fine  particles of stone, esp. of siliceous stone, but not reduced
   to  dust;  comminuted stone in the form of loose grains, which are not
   coherent when wet.

     That  finer  matter,  called  sand,  is  no  other  than very small
     pebbles. Woodsward.

   2. A single particle of such stone. [R.] Shak.

   3. The sand in the hourglass; hence, a moment or interval of time; the
   term or extent of one's life.

     The sands are numbered that make up my life. Shak.

   4.  pl.  Tracts of land consisting of sand, like the deserts of Arabia
   and  Africa;  also, extensive tracts of sand exposed by the ebb of the
   tide. "The Libyan sands." Milton. "The sands o'Dee." C. Kingsley.

   5. Courage; pluck; grit. [Slang]
   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.
     _________________________________________________________________

   Page 1274

   --
   Sand  grouse  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one of many species of Old World birds
   belonging  to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and
   pigeons.  Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga. They mostly
   belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as  the  common Indian species (P.
   exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P.  arenarius), the painted sand
   grouse  (P.  fasciatus),  and the pintail sand grouse (P. alchata) are
   also  found  in  India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. -- Sand hill, a
   hill  of  sand;  a  dune.  -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the American
   brown  crane (Grus Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a beach flea;
   an  orchestian.  -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. -- Sand lark.
   (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of India. (b) A
   small  sandpiper,  or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the
   common  European  sandpiper.  (c)  The  Australian red-capped dotterel
   (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also red-necked plover. --
   Sand  launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. -- Sand lizard (Zo\'94l.),
   a  common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). -- Sand martin (Zo\'94l.),
   the  bank  swallow.  --  Sand  mole (Zo\'94l.), the coast rat. -- Sand
   monitor  (Zo\'94l.), a large Egyptian lizard (Monitor arenarius) which
   inhabits  dry localities. -- Sand mouse (Zo\'94l.), the dunlin. [Prov.
   Eng.]  --  Sand  myrtle.  (Bot.)  See  under Myrtle. -- Sand partridge
   (Zo\'94l.),  either  of  two  small  Asiatic  partridges  of the genus
   Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species
   (A.  Heeji)  inhabits  Palestine  and  Arabia.  The  other species (A.
   Bonhami),  inhabiting  Central  Asia, is called also seesee partridge,
   and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture,  a  picture  made  by putting sand of
   different  colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike. (Zo\'94l.) (a)
   The  sauger.  (b)  The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand storm which
   takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts
   like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe (Geol.), a tubular
   cavity,  from  a  few  inches  to  several  feet  in  dept,  occurring
   especially  in  calcareous  rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand,
   etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall. -- Sand pride (Zo\'94l.), a small
   british  lamprey  now considered to be the young of larger species; --
   called  also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian well boring, a long,
   slender  bucket  with  a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the
   well.  -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher. -- Sand rock, a rock
   made  of  cemented  sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.), the turnstone. --
   Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or o\'94thec\'91, of
   any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera. It has the shape of
   a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also sand
   collar. -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod crustacean (Lepidactylis
   arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy  seabeaches  of Europe and
   America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.),  an  American shark (Odontaspis
   littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; --
   called  also  gray shark, and dogfish shark. See Illust. under Remora.
   --  Sand  skink  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one of several species of Old World
   lizards  belonging  to  the  genus  Seps; as, the ocellated sand skink
   (Seps  ocellatus)  of  Southern  Europe. -- Sand skipper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea, or orchestian. -- Sand smelt (Zo\'94l.), a silverside. --
   Sand  snake.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a)  Any  one of several species of harmless
   burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native of Southern Europe, Africa,
   and  Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India and E. Johnii, used by snake
   charmers.   (b)  Any  innocuous  South  African  snake  of  the  genus
   Psammophis,  especially  P.  sibilans.  --  Sand snipe (Zo\'94l.), the
   sandpiper.  --  Sand star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on
   sandy  sea  bottoms;  a  brittle  star. -- Sand storm, a cloud of sand
   driven  violently by the wind. -- Sand sucker, the sandnecker. -- Sand
   swallow  (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under Bank. -- Sand tube, a
   tube  made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced
   by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zo\'94l.) Any tube made of
   cemented  sand. (c) (Zo\'94l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous
   particles  in  its  wall,  which connects the oral water tube with the
   madreporic plate. -- Sand viper. (Zo\'94l.) See Hognose snake. -- Sand
   wasp  (Zo\'94l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects
   belonging  to  the  families  Pompilid\'91  and Spherid\'91, which dig
   burrows  in  sand.  The  female  provisions  the  nest with insects or
   spiders  which  she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for
   her young.

                                     Sand

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food for her young.> Sand (?), v. t.
   [imp. & p. p. Sanded; p. pr. & vb. n. Sanding.]

   1. To sprinkle or cover with sand.

   2. To drive upon the sand. [Obs.] Burton.

   3. To bury (oysters) beneath drifting sand or mud.

   4.  To  mix  with  sand  for  purposes  of  fraud;  as, to sand sugar.
   [Colloq.]  <--  5.  To  grind  down  or make smooth by rubbing with an
   abrasive object, esp. with sandpaper; to sand down -->

                                    Sandal

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San"dal (?), n. Same
   as Sendal.

     Sails of silk and ropes of sandal. Longfellow.

                                    Sandal

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food  for  her  young.>  San"dal, n.
   Sandalwood. "Fans of sandal." Tennyson.

                                    Sandal

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food for her young.> San"dal, n. [F.
   sandale, L. sandalium, Gr. sandal.] (a) A kind of shoe consisting of a
   sole  strapped  to  the  foot; a protection for the foot, covering its
   lower  surface,  but  not  its  upper.  (b)  A kind of slipper. (c) An
   overshoe with parallel openings across the instep.

                                   Sandaled

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San"daled (?), a.

   1. Wearing sandals.

     The measured footfalls of his sandaled feet. Longfellow.

   2. Made like a sandal.

                                  Sandaliform

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> San*dal"i*form (?),
   a. [Sandal + -form.] (Bot.) Shaped like a sandal or slipper.

                                  Sandalwood

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San"dal*wood (?), n.
   [F.  sandal,  santal,  fr.  Ar.  &cced;andal,  or  Gr. sa`ntalon; both
   ultimately  fr.  Skr.  candana.  Cf.  Sanders.]  (Bot.) (a) The highly
   perfumed  yellowish  heartwood  of  an East Indian and Polynesian tree
   (Santalum album), and of several other trees of the same genus, as the
   Hawaiian  Santalum Freycinetianum and S. pyrularium, the Australian S.
   latifolium,  etc.  The  name  is  extended  to  several other kinds of
   fragrant  wood.  (b)  Any  tree of the genus Santalum, or a tree which
   yields  sandalwood.  (c)  The red wood of a kind of buckthorn, used in
   Russia  for  dyeing leather (Rhamnus Dahuricus). False sandalwood, the
   fragrant  wood  of several trees not of the genus Santalum, as Ximenia
   Americana, Myoporum tenuifolium of Tahiti. -- Red sandalwood, a heavy,
   dark red dyewood, being the heartwood of two leguminous trees of India
   (Pterocarpus santalinus, and Adenanthera pavonina); -- called also red
   sanderswood, sanders or saunders, and rubywood.

                              Sandarach, Sandarac

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food  for  her  young.> San"da*rach,
   San"da*rac, (, n. [L. sandaraca, Gr.

   1. (Min.) Realgar; red sulphide of arsenic. [Archaic]

   2.  (Bot.  Chem.) A white or yellow resin obtained from a Barbary tree
   (Callitris  quadrivalvis  or  Thuya  articulata),  and  pulverized for
   pounce; -- probably so called from a resemblance to the mineral.

                                  Sandbagger

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"bag`ger (?), n.
   An assaulter whose weapon is a sand bag. See Sand bag, under Sand.

                                  Sand-blind

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"-blind" (?), a.
   [For  sam blind half blind; AS. s\'bem- half (akin to semi-) + blind.]
   Having defective sight; dim-sighted; purblind. Shak.

                                    Sanded

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"ed, a.

   1. Covered or sprinkled with sand; sandy; barren. Thomson.

   2.  Marked  with  small  spots;  variegated with spots; speckled; of a
   sandy color, as a hound. Shak.

   3. Short-sighted. [Prov. Eng.]

                                  Sandemanian

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San`de*ma"ni*an (?),
   n.  (Eccl.  Hist.)  A follower of Robert Sandeman, a Scotch sectary of
   the eighteenth century. See Glassite.

                                Sandemanianism

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> San`de*ma"ni*an*ism
   (?), n. The faith or system of the Sandemanians. A. Fuller.

                                  Sanderling

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San"der*ling (?), n.
   [Sand  + 0ling. So called because it obtains its food by searching the
   moist  sands  of  the  seashore.]  (Zo\'94l.)  A  small gray and brown
   sandpiper (Calidris arenaria) very common on sandy beaches in America,
   Europe,  and  Asia. Called also curwillet, sand lark, stint, and ruddy
   plover.

                                    Sanders

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as food for her young.> San"ders (?), n.
   [See  Sandal.]  An old name of sandalwood, now applied only to the red
   sandalwood. See under Sandalwood.

                                 Sanders-blue

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> San"ders-blue" (?),
   n. See Saundersblue.

                                   Sandever

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> San"de*ver (?), n.
   See Sandiver. [Obs.]

                                   Sandfish

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> Sand"fish` (?), n.
   (Zo\'94l.)  A  small marine fish of the Pacific coast of North America
   (Trichodon trichodon) which buries itself in the sand.

                                   Sandglass

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"glass` (?), n.
   An  instrument  for  measuring  time  by  the  running  of  sand.  See
   Hourglass.

                                  Sandhiller

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"hill`er (?), n.
   A  nickname  given  to any "poor white" living in the pine woods which
   cover the sandy hills in Georgia and South Carolina. [U.S.]

                                   Sandiness

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"i*ness (?), n.
   The quality or state of being sandy, or of being of a sandy color.

                                    Sandish

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food  for  her  young.> Sand"ish, a.
   Approaching the nature of sand; loose; not compact. [Obs.] Evelyn.

                                   Sandiver

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> San"di*ver (?), n.
   [Perh.  fr.  OF. sa\'8bn grease, fat + de of + verre glass (cf. Saim),
   or  fr.  F.  sel de verre sandiver.] A whitish substance which is cast
   up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on
   the  top, is skimmed off; -- called also glass gall. [Formerly written
   also sandever.]

                                    Sandix

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> San"dix (?), n. [L.
   sandix,  sandyx,  vermilion,  or a color like vermilion, Gr. A kind of
   minium, or red lead, made by calcining carbonate of lead, but inferior
   to true minium. [Written also sandyx.] [Obs.]

                                    Sandman

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"man` (?), n. A
   mythical person who makes children sleepy, so that they rub their eyes
   as if there were sand in them.

                                  Sandnecker

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"neck`er (?), n.
   (Zo\'94l.)  A  European  flounder  (Hippoglossoides  limandoides);  --
   called also rough dab, long fluke, sand fluke, and sand sucker.

                                   Sandpaper

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"pa`per (?), n.
   Paper  covered on one side with sand glued fast, -- used for smoothing
   and polishing.

                                   Sandpaper

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> Sand"pa`per, v. t.
   To smooth or polish with sandpaper; as, to sandpaper a door.

                                   Sandpiper

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"pi`per (?), n.

   1.  (Zo\'94l.)  Any  one  of numerous species of small limicoline game
   birds  belonging  to Tringa, Actodromas, Ereunetes, and various allied
   genera of the family Tringid\'91.

     NOTE: &hand; Th e mo st im portant No rth Am erican species are the
     pestoral  sandpiper  (Tringa maculata), called also browback, grass
     snipe, and jacksnipe; the red-backed, or black-breasted, sandpiper,
     or  dunlin  (T.  alpina);  the  purple  sandpiper  (T.maritima: the
     red-breasted  sandpiper,  or  knot  (T.  canutus); the semipalmated
     sandpiper   (Ereunetes   pusillus);   the   spotted  sandpiper,  or
     teeter-tail   (Actitis   macularia);  the  buff-breasted  sandpiper
     (Tryngites  subruficollis), and the Bartramian sandpiper, or upland
     plover.  See  under  Upland.  Among  the  European  species are the
     dunlin,  the  knot,  the  ruff,  the  sanderling,  and  the  common
     sandpiper   (Actitis,   OR  tringoides,  hypoleucus),  called  also
     fiddler,  peeper,  pleeps, weet-weet, and summer snipe. Some of the
     small plovers and tattlers are also called sandpipers.

   2. (Zo\'94l.) A small lamprey eel; the pride.
   Curlew  sandpiper.  See  under  Curlew.  -- Stilt sandpiper. See under
   Stilt.

                                    Sandpit

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"pit` (?), n. A
   pit or excavation from which sand is or has been taken.

                                    Sandre

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food for her young.> San"dre (?), n.
   (Zo\'94l.)  A Russian fish (Lucioperca sandre) which yields a valuable
   oil, called sandre oil, used in the preparation of caviare.

                                   Sandstone

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"stone` (?), n.
   A  rock  made  of sand more or less firmly united. Common or siliceous
   sandstone consists mainly of quartz sand.

     NOTE: &hand; Di fferent na mes ar e ap lied to the various kinds of
     sandstone   according   to   their   composition;   as,   granitic,
     argillaceous, micaceous, etc.

   Flexible  sandstone  (Min.), the finer-grained variety of itacolumite,
   which  on  account  of  the  scales of mica in the lamination is quite
   flexible.  --  Red  sandstone, a name given to two extensive series of
   British  rocks in which red sandstones predominate, one below, and the
   other  above,  the coal measures. These were formerly known as the Old
   and  the  New Red Sandstone respectively, and the former name is still
   retained for the group preceding the Coal and referred to the Devonian
   age,  but  the  term New Red Sandstone is now little used, some of the
   strata being regarded as Permian and the remained as Triassic. See the
   Chart of Geology.
   
                                   Sandwich
                                       
   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> Sand"wich (?; 277),
   n.  [Named  from the Earl of Sandwich.] Two pieces of bread and butter
   with  a  thin slice of meat, cheese, or the like, between them. <-- 2.
   Any food composed of two pieces of bread with another food in between.
   3. Any object composed of two layers of one subtance on either side of
   a second substance. -->

                                   Sandwich

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as food for her young.> Sand"wich, v. t.
   [imp.  &  p.  p. Sandwiched (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Sandwiching.] To make
   into  a  sandwich;  also,  figuratively, to insert between portions of
   something  dissimilar;  to  form  of  alternate  parts  or  things, or
   alternating layers of a different nature; to interlard.

                                   Sandworm

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> Sand"worm` (?), n.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of annelids which burrow in
   the  sand  of  the  seashore. (b) Any species of annelids of the genus
   Sabellaria.  They  construct  firm tubes of agglutinated sand on rocks
   and  shells, and are sometimes destructive to oysters. (c) The chigoe,
   a species of flea.

                                   Sandwort

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> Sand"wort` (?), n.
   (Bot.)  Any  plant  of  the  genus  Arenaria, low, tufted herbs (order
   Caryophyllace\'91.) <-- "of" missing? -->

                                     Sandy

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food  for her young.> Sand"y (?), a.
   [Compar. Sandier (?); superl. Sandiest.] [AS. sandig.]

   1.  Consisting  of, abounding with, or resembling, sand; full of sand;
   covered or sprinkled with sand; as, a sandy desert, road, or soil.

   2.  Of  the  color  of sand; of a light yellowish red color; as, sandy
   hair.

                                    Sandyx

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San"dyx (?), n. [L.]
   See Sandix.

                                     Sane

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as food for her young.> Sane (?), a. [L.
   sanus; cf. Gr. Sound, a.]

   1.  Being  in a healthy condition; not deranged; acting rationally; --
   said of the mind.

   2.  Mentally  sound;  possessing  a  rational  mind; having the mental
   faculties  in  such condition as to be able to anticipate and judge of
   the  effect of one's actions in an ordinary maner; -- said of persons.
   Syn. -- Sound; healthy; underanged; unbroken.

                                   Saneness

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve as food for her young.> Sane"ness, n. The
   state of being sane; sanity.

                                     Sang

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve as food for her young.> Sang (?), imp. of
   Sing.

                                 Sanga, Sangu

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> San"ga (?), San"gu
   (?),  n. (Zo\'94l.) The Abyssinian ox (Bos OR Bibos, Africanus), noted
   for the great length of its horns. It has a hump on its back.

                                   Sangaree

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and which serve as food for her young.> San`ga*ree" (?), n.
   [Sp.  sangria,  lit.,  bleeding, from sangre, blood, L. sanguis.] Wine
   and water sweetened and spiced, -- a favorite West Indian drink.

                                  Sang-froid

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> Sang`-froid" (?), n.
   [F.,  cold  blood.]  Freedom  from  agitation  or  excitement of mind;
   coolness in trying circumstances; indifference; calmness. Burke.

                                    Sangiac

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve as food for her young.> San"gi*ac (?), n.
   See Sanjak.

                              Sangraal, Sangreal

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as  food for her young.> San`graal" (?),
   San"gre*al  (?),  n.  [See  Saint,  and  Grail.] See Holy Grail, under
   Grail.

                                 Sanguiferous

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San*guif"er*ous (?),
   a.  [L.  sanguis  blood  +  -ferous.]  (Physiol.) Conveying blood; as,
   sanguiferous vessels, i. e., the arteries, veins, capillaries.

                                Sanguification

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> San`gui*fi*ca"tion
   (?),   n.  [Cf.  F.  sanguification.  See  Sanguify.]  (Physiol.)  The
   production  of blood; the conversion of the products of digestion into
   blood; hematosis.

                                  Sanguifier

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> San"gui*fi`er (?),
   n. A producer of blood.

                                 Sanguifluous

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San*guif"lu*ous (?),
   a. [L. sanguis blood + fluere to flow.] Flowing or running with blood.

                                   Sanguify

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which serve as food for her young.> San"gui*fy (?), v.
   t. [L. sanguis blood + -fy: cf. F. sanguifier.] To produce blood from.

                                 Sanguigenous

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San*guig"e*nous (?),
   a. [L. sanguis + -genous.] Producing blood; as, sanguigenous food.

                                 Sanguinaceous

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging,  and  which  serve  as food for her young.> San`gui*na"ceous
   (?), n. Of a blood-red color; sanguine.

                                  Sanguinaria

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United States. -- Sand cusk
   (Zo\'94l.), any ophidiod fish. See Illust. under Ophidiod. -- Sand dab
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small American flounder (Limanda ferruginea); -- called
   also  rusty  dab.  The  name  is  also applied locally to other allied
   species.  --  Sand darter (Zo\'94l.), a small etheostomoid fish of the
   Ohio valley (Ammocrypta pellucida). -- Sand dollar (Zo\'94l.), any one
   of  several  species of small flat circular sea urchins, which live on
   sandy  bottoms, especially Echinarachnius parma of the American coast.
   --  Sand  drift, drifting sand; also, a mound or bank of drifted sand.
   --  Sand  eel. (Zo\'94l.) (a) A lant, or launce. (b) A slender Pacific
   Ocean  fish of the genus Gonorhynchus, having barbels about the mouth.
   -- Sand flag, sandstone which splits up into flagstones. -- Sand flea.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any species of flea which inhabits, or breeds in, sandy
   places,  especially  the  common  dog  flea.  (b)  the chigoe. (c) Any
   leaping  amphipod  crustacean;  a beach flea, or orchestian. See Beach
   flea,  under  Beach. -- Sand flood, a vast body of sand borne along by
   the  wind.  James Bruce. -- Sand fluke. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sandnecker.
   (b)  The  European  smooth dab (Pleuronectes microcephalus); -- called
   also  kitt, marysole, smear dab, town dab. -- Sand fly (Zo\'94l.), any
   one of several species of small dipterous flies of the genus Simulium,
   abounding  on  sandy shores, especially Simulium nocivum of the United
   States.  They  are very troublesome on account of their biting habits.
   Called also no-see-um, punky, and midge. -- Sand gall (Geol.) See Sand
   pipe, below. -- Sand grass (Bot.), any species of grass which grows in
   sand;  especially,  a  tufted grass (Triplasis purpurea) with numerous
   bearded  joints,  and  acid awl-shaped leaves, growing on the Atlantic
   coast.  1274 -- Sand grouse (Zo\'94l.), any one of many species of Old
   World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both
   grouse  and  pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga.
   They  mostly  belong  to  the  genus  Pterocles,  as the common Indian
   species  (P.  exustus).  The  large  sand  grouse  (P. arenarius), the
   painted  sand  grouse  (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P.
   alchata)  are  also  found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. --
   Sand  hill, a hill of sand; a dune. -- Sand-hill crane (Zo\'94l.), the
   American  brown  crane  (Grus  Mexicana). -- Sand hopper (Zo\'94l.), a
   beach  flea; an orchestian. -- Sand hornet (Zo\'94l.), a sand wasp. --
   Sand  lark.  (Zo\'94l.)  (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of
   India.  (b)  A  small  sandpiper,  or  plover,  as  the  ringneck, the
   sanderling,  and  the  common  European  sandpiper. (c) The Australian
   red-capped  dotterel  (\'92gialophilus  ruficapillus);  -- called also
   red-necked  plover.  --  Sand launce (Zo\'94l.), a lant, or launce. --
   Sand  lizard (Zo\'94l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). --
   Sand martin (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. -- Sand mole (Zo\'94l.), the
   coast  rat.  --  Sand  monitor  (Zo\'94l.),  a  large  Egyptian lizard
   (Monitor  arenarius)  which  inhabits  dry  localities.  -- Sand mouse
   (Zo\'94l.),  the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under
   Myrtle.  --  Sand  partridge  (Zo\'94l.),  either of two small Asiatic
   partridges  of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus
   is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The
   other  species  (A.  Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also
   seesee  partridge,  and  teehoo.  --  Sand  picture, a picture made by
   putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. -- Sand pike.
   (Zo\'94l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. -- Sand pillar, a sand
   storm  which  takes  the  form of a whirling pillar in its progress in
   desert  tracts  like  those  of  the Sahara and Mongolia. -- Sand pipe
   (Geol.),  a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in dept,
   occurring  especially  in  calcareous  rocks,  and  often  filled with
   gravel,   sand,  etc.;  --  called  also  sand  gall.  --  Sand  pride
   (Zo\'94l.),  a small british lamprey now considered to be the young of
   larger  species;  --  called also sand prey. -- Sand pump, in artesian
   well  boring,  a  long,  slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for
   raising sand from the well. -- Sand rat (Zo\'94l.), the pocket gopher.
   -- Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. -- Sand runner (Zo\'94l.),
   the turnstone. -- Sand saucer (Zo\'94l.), the mass of egg capsules, or
   o\'94thec\'91,  of  any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera.
   It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand;
   --  called  also  sand  collar.  -- Sand screw (Zo\'94l.), an amphipod
   crustacean  (Lepidactylis  arenarius),  which  burrows  in  the  sandy
   seabeaches  of  Europe  and  America.  --  Sand  shark  (Zo\'94l.), an
   American  shark  (Odontaspis  littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of
   the  Eastern  United  States;  --  called also gray shark, and dogfish
   shark.  See Illust. under Remora. -- Sand skink (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   several  species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as,
   the  ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. -- Sand
   skipper  (Zo\'94l.),  a  beach  flea,  or  orchestian.  --  Sand smelt
   (Zo\'94l.),  a  silverside.  --  Sand snake. (Zo\'94l.) (a) Any one of
   several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native
   of  Southern  Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. Jaculus of India
   and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African
   snake  of  the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. -- Sand snipe
   (Zo\'94l.),  the  sandpiper.  --  Sand  star (Zo\'94l.), an ophiurioid
   starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. -- Sand storm, a
   cloud  of  sand  driven  violently  by  the  wind. -- Sand sucker, the
   sandnecker.  --  Sand  swallow (Zo\'94l.), the bank swallow. See under
   Bank.  --  Sand  tube,  a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of
   vitrified  sand,  produced  by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b)
   (Zo\'94l.)   Any  tube  made  of  cemented  sand.  (c)  (Zo\'94l.)  In
   starfishes,  a  tube  having  calcareous  particles in its wall, which
   connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. -- Sand viper.
   (Zo\'94l.)  See  Hognose  snake.  --  Sand wasp (Zo\'94l.), any one of
   numerous  species  of  hymenopterous insects belonging to the families
   Pompilid\'91  and  Spherid\'91,  which dig burrows in sand. The female
   provisions  the  nest  with  insects or spiders which she paralyzes by
   stinging, and which serve as food for her young.> San`gui*na"ri*a (?),
   n. [NL. See Sanguinary, a. & n.]

   1. (Bot.) A genus of plants of the Poppy family.

     NOTE: &hand; Sa nguinaria Ca nadensis, or  bl oodroot, is  the only
     species.  It  has  a  perennial  rootstock,  which  sends  up a few
     roundish  lobed leaves and solitary white blossoms in early spring.
     See Bloodroot.

   2. The rootstock of the bloodroot, used in medicine as an emetic, etc.

                                 Sanguinarily

   Sand  badger  (Zo\'94l.),  the Japanese badger (Meles ankuma). -- Sand
   bag (a) A bag filled with sand or earth, used for various purposes, as
   in  fortification,  for ballast, etc. (b) A long bag filled with sand,
   used  as a club by assassins. -- Sand ball, soap mixed with sand, made
   into  a ball for use at the toilet. -- Sand bath. (a) (Chem.) A vessel
   of  hot  sand  in a laboratory, in which vessels that are to be heated
   are  partially  immersed.  (b) A bath in which the body is immersed in
   hot  sand.  --  Sand  bed,  a  thick  layer of sand, whether deposited
   naturally  or  artificially;  specifically, a thick layer of sand into
   which  molten  metal is run in casting, or from a reducing furnace. --
   Sand  birds  (Zo\'94l.),  a  collective  name  for numerous species of
   limicoline  birds, such as the sandpipers, plovers, tattlers, and many
   others;  --  called  also  shore  birds.  --  Sand blast, a process of
   engraving  and cutting glass and other hard substances by driving sand
   against  them by a steam jet or otherwise; also, the apparatus used in
   the  process.  --  Sand box. (a) A box with a perforated top or cover,
   for sprinkling paper with sand. (b) A box carried on locomotives, from
   which sand runs on the rails in front of the driving wheel, to prevent
   slipping.  --  Sand-box  tree  (Bot.),  a tropical American tree (Hura
   crepitans).  Its fruit is a depressed many-celled woody capsule which,
   when completely dry, bursts with a loud report and scatters the seeds.
   See  Illust.  of  Regma.  -- Sand bug (Zo\'94l.), an American anomuran
   crustacean  (Hippa talpoidea) which burrows in sandy seabeaches. It is
   often  used  as  bait by fishermen. See Illust. under Anomura. -- Sand
   canal  (Zo\'94l.),  a  tubular vessel having a calcareous coating, and
   connecting  the  oral ambulacral ring with the madreporic tubercle. It
   appears  to  be  excretory  in  function. -- Sand cock (Zo\'94l.), the
   redshank. [Prov. Eng.] -- Sand collar. (Zo\'94l.) Same as Sand saucer,
   below. -- Sand crab. (Zo\'94l.) (a) The lady crab. (b) A land crab, or
   ocypodian.  --  Sand crack (Far.), a crack extending downward from the
   coronet,  in  the wall of a horse's hoof, which often causes lameness.
   --  Sand  cricket  (Zo\'94l.),  any  one  of  several species of large
   terrestrial  crickets  of  the genus Stenophelmatus and allied genera,
   native  of the sandy plains of the Western United S